Artemis by Andy Weir

Book Review

 


ArtemisBook Genre: Science Fiction, 

Book Series: N/A

Released: 11/14/17 by Crown Publishing

Pages: 384 Price: $27.00 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book: Amazon Artemis: A Novel

Source: I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

 

 

Book Synopsis:

Jazz Bashara is a criminal.

Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you’re not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you’ve got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent.

Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to commit the perfect crime, with a reward too lucrative to turn down. But pulling off the impossible is just the start of her problems, as she learns that she’s stepped square into a conspiracy for control of Artemis itself—and that now, her only chance at survival lies in a gambit even riskier than the first.

My Review:

Let me start this review off by stating that I love The Martian,  I mean really love that book.  If you follow my blog then you already know this because it seems like I am constantly pimping the book.  I have reviewed it three times after all…(all linked in this review) I was super excited to get my hands on Mr. Weir’s second title because I have also enjoyed many of his short stories that he has published on his website.  Let me also get this out-of-the-way, Artemis is not as strong a story as The Martian.  It simply isn’t.  That’s okay, though, there was a lot to live up to in The Martian and that doesn’t mean that Artemis isn’t a thoroughly enjoyable book because it is.  I’m still giving it five stars, not that I think they are equal, just that The Martian probably deserved like ten stars from me.

Before I started my review I decided to check out some of the other blogger’s thoughts on Artemis and found a mixed bag, some glowing some more critical.  I tend to agree with many of the points of either type of review but they didn’t sway my opinion and decision to give this book five stars.  Let me tell you why.

Lets start with Jazz who seems to receive most of the harsh criticism from reviewers.  Yep she is a little rough around the edges and it can be difficult for a male author to capture the essence of female-hood.  Not that it can’t be done, but it can be a challenge, just as the opposite can be true of a female writing a male.  The tendencies to get carried away with stereotypes can be strong, also sometimes the character can come off feeling a bit off.  Personally I liked Jazz.  I thought she was well written, sure a bit awkward at times and juvenile, but that isn’t necessarily mean she isn’t authentic.  When you take into account the history of the character I think Jazz is pretty true to form.  She was a young girl raised by a single father on the moon.  She is a tomboy and probably didn’t have a strong female role model in her life.  I think she works and have known people in real life like her.  She was smart and funny and I appreciated the strong moral code she lived her life as a smuggler under.  She was flawed but redeeming which makes for a pretty strong character in my book. Just because you might not like someone and think they are awkward doesn’t mean they are lacking.

Now for what I love most about Andy Weir’s books.  The science!  I love that his science fiction is based in real science.  He doesn’t cheat, at least to my non-scientific liberal-arts fine art-degree mind that is.  I might not understand everything he explains in his stories but I love the fact that he takes the time to anyway and doesn’t make me feel stupid in the meantime.  I also enjoy how the lead character talks to the reader, breaking the fourth wall can be tricky.  Easily overdone but not in this instance.  Weir uses it to keep the reader engaged and invested in the story not to mention for comedic reasons.  I loved it!

On last point in this book’s favor that I feel has been overlooked in all the reviews I’ve read thus far.  The diversity in this book is amazing!  I can’t think of a more diverse cast of characters in any book that I’ve ever read, and there have been quite a few.  I don’t know if this speaks more to my reading taste or the industry in general but one of us needs to expand our horizon’s more.  This book was amazing in this regard.  Jazz is a Muslim Saudi female who is the hero of this story!!!  I don’t want to spoil anything else (that was leaked already by Mr. Weir on Facebook) but this book does an excellent job of portraying a diverse blended society.  One other thing I noticed in this book was the lack of Americans.  I’m sure they were there but most of the main functions of this society were not run by companies or people from The United States.   Hmm.  I wonder if this was a bit of social commentary by the author of what might happen to a powerful society that rejects science.  I think it does.

Is the book perfect.  No it can feel a little awkward at times but it was still fun and the ending was amazing.  I can’t wait to add this title to my home library permanently.   I also can’t wait to share this review and book with you my followers and my library patrons.

My Rating: 5 Stars

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A Christmas Blizzard by Garrison Keillor

Book Review

 


A Christmas Blizzard: A NovelBook Genre: Fiction, Holiday, Humor

Book Series: N/A

Released: 10/25/11 by Penguin Books 

Pages: 181 Price: $14.00 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book: Amazon A Christmas Blizzard: A Novel

Source: I borrowed this book from my library

 

 

Book Synopsis:

The inimitable Garrison Keillor spins “a Christmas tale that makes Dickens seem unimaginative by comparison” (Charlotte Creative Loafing) Snow is falling all across the Midwest as James Sparrow, a country- bumpkin-turned-energy-drink-tycoon, and his wife awaken in their sky- rise apartment overlooking Chicago. Even down with the stomach bug, Mrs. Sparrow yearns to see The Nutcracker while James yearns only to escape-the faux-cheer, the bitter cold, the whole Christmas season. An urgent phone call from his hometown of Looseleaf, North Dakota, sends James into the midst of his lunatic relatives and a historic blizzard. As he hunkers weather the storm, the electricity goes out and James is visited by a parade of figures who deliver him an epiphany worthy of the season, just in time to receive Mrs. Sparrow’s wonderful Christmas gift. Garrison Keillor’s holiday farce is the perfect gift for the millions of fans who tune into A Prairie Home Companion every week.

My Review:

It took me a week to get through this 181-page story that should be enough to tell you what I thought of it.  This was a book that was selected for a book talk at the library where I work so please know that I did not select this title on my own.  If I had I would have DNF it after 20 pages and you would not have this review.  But I did read it and feel that has earned me the right to criticize it.

This story sucked.  Majorly.  It started off coherent and then took a nose dive into strangeville about half-way through.  The characters were all over the place and I struggled to find one that I even liked.  Lots of stereotypes that were meant to be funny but did not come off that way to me, more offensive in my opinion.  There is actually supposed to be a lot of humor in this story but I don’t think that I laughed once. There was also too much talking about politics for a Christmas story for me.  The ending fit the book in that it came totally out of left field and did not make sense.  The book is just trying too hard to be a Christmas miracle and come off as weird or stupid.

The only redeeming quality that this book held for me is that it was short but somehow I still ended up wasting a week on it.  I’m not a fan of Christmas.  I’m not a fan of folksy humor.  This is simply not a book for me and I don’t think I will be picking up anything else by this author.

My Rating: 1 Star

Fowl Language: The Struggle is Real by Brian Gordon

Book Review

 


Fowl Language: The Struggle Is RealBook Genre: Humor, Graphic Novel, Comic

Book Series: N/A

Released: 10/10/17 by Andrew McMeel Publishing

Pages:  128 Price: $14.99 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I received a copy of this e-book from the publisher for an honest review.

 

 

Book Synopsis:

Are you a mom or dad? How wonderful and annoying for you!
Do you know someone who will soon have a baby? How exciting and terrifying for them!
Are your friends parents, too? Of course they are, those poor sons of bitches . . .

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then Fowler Language is for you.
And if you answered no, then congratulations, and feel free to sleep in this weekend!

Thirty percent of the content in Fowler Language is original to the book, and the Fowl Language bonus panels will be included.

My Review:

Let me start with I am not the targeted audience for this book.  I am not a parent and relish my child-free lifestyle.  When I saw this book’s cover and that it was a read now title over at Net Galley I decided to review it because who hasn’t enjoyed these illustrations when they pop up in their newsfeed on Facebook.

I have never laughed so hard while reading a book about the ups and downs of parenthood. I laughed so hard I worried about my blood pressure!  This book was so funny and I even found parts that, as a pet parent, I could relate to.  Other bits I got simply from having once been a child myself.  So no matter who you are, parent, aunt, uncle, child-free I believe you will enjoy this book.  If you know someone who is a new or experienced parent than this would make a great gift!

My Rating:5 Stars

Lady Stuff: Secrets to Being a Woman by Loryn Brantz

Book Review

 


Lady Stuff: Secrets to Being a WomanBook Genre: Non-Fiction, Humor, Comics

Book Series: N/A

Released: 9/ 26/17 by Andrews McMeel Publishing

Pages: 128  Price: $14.99 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book:  Lady Stuff: Secrets to Being a Woman

Source: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for an honest review.  

Book Synopsis:

A collection of Loryn Brantz’s vibrant and relatable Jellybean Comics about her everyday experiences as a lady 

Home manicure tips, awkward seduction techniques, scoping out the snack table, and—most important—prioritizing naps: Lady Stuff reveals these womanly secrets and more. In sections like “Grooming and Habitat Maintenance,” “Mating Habits,” and others, these brightly colored, adorable comics find the humor in the awkwardness of simply existing.
 
Like the work of Sarah Andersen, Gemma Correll, and Allie Brosh, Loryn Brantz’s Jellybean Comics are accessible and funny; lighthearted takes on the author’s everyday experiences and struggles being a woman.

My Review:

Like many of you, I’ve seen this author’s work on Facebook and other social media platforms as memes but did not realize that when requesting this book for review.  What pulled me in was the title and description, also the fact that it was a read now title on Net Galley.  I decided to take a shot and see what this book was all about.

What I received was a fun little read that was quite clever and poignant at times.  Besides being totally funny I found myself thinking oh yeah I totally get that.  These illustrations are going to be so relatable to any woman, this would make an excellent gift for your best girlfriend!  Not very long but well done this book also worked well on my e-reader, perhaps the only time that a graphic novel book worked for me!

Not much more I can say beyond that.  It was a fun read that would make a great gift!

My Rating: 4 Stars

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

Book Review

 


The Rosie Project (Don Tillman, #1)Book Genre: Fiction, Contemporary, Humor

Book Series: Don Tillman #1

Released: 10/1/2013

Pages:297  Price$24.00 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book: The Rosie Project: A Novel

Source: I borrowed the audiobook from my library

 

 

Book Synopsis:

An international sensation, this hilarious, feel-good novel is narrated by an oddly charming and socially challenged genetics professor on an unusual quest: to find out if he is capable of true love.

Don Tillman, professor of genetics, has never been on a second date. He is a man who can count all his friends on the fingers of one hand, whose lifelong difficulty with social rituals has convinced him that he is simply not wired for romance. So when an acquaintance informs him that he would make a “wonderful” husband, his first reaction is shock. Yet he must concede to the statistical probability that there is someone for everyone, and he embarks upon The Wife Project. In the orderly, evidence-based manner with which he approaches all things, Don sets out to find the perfect partner. She will be punctual and logical—most definitely not a barmaid, a smoker, a drinker, or a late-arriver.

Yet Rosie Jarman is all these things. She is also beguiling, fiery, intelligent—and on a quest of her own. She is looking for her biological father, a search that a certain DNA expert might be able to help her with. Don’s Wife Project takes a back burner to the Father Project and an unlikely relationship blooms, forcing the scientifically minded geneticist to confront the spontaneous whirlwind that is Rosie—and the realization that love is not always what looks good on paper.

The Rosie Project is a moving and hilarious novel for anyone who has ever tenaciously gone after life or love in the face of overwhelming challenges.

My Review:

This is my second reading of this book if you wish to see the original review it is linked here.

My library is reading this book for a book talk and I decided to listen to the story this time instead of reading it. It was just as enjoyable the second time around as it was the first. After rereading my earlier review I do not see any changes I would make and stand by my earlier assessment. As to listening to the book vs reading it. The fact that the narrator speaks with an Aussie accent does add a fair bit of charm to the story but might be a bit of a struggle to those who have difficulty understanding accents, my husband for example. If that isn’t an issue for you then I recommend either version as both are enjoyable. Cute story.

My Rating: 4 Stars

The Long Way to A Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers

Book Review

 


The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers, #1)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Adventure, Space Opera

Book Series: Wayfarers #1

Released: 8/18/15 by Harper Voyager

Pages: 467  Price: $15.99 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book:  The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers)

Source: I borrowed this book from my library.

 

 

Book Synopsis:

A rollicking space adventure with a lot of heart
When Rosemary Harper joins the crew of the Wayfarer, she isn’t expecting much. The patched-up ship has seen better days, but it offers her everything she could possibly want: a spot to call home, a chance to explore the far-off corners of the galaxy, and some distance from her past.
And nothing could be further from what she’s known than the crew of the Wayfarer.
From Sissix, the exotic reptilian pilot, to Kizzy and Jenks, the chatty engineers who keep the ship running, to the noble captain Ashby, life aboard is chaotic and crazy—exactly what Rosemary wants. That is until the crew is offered the job of a lifetime tunneling wormholes through space to a distant planet. Sure, they’ll earn enough money to live comfortably for years, but risking her life wasn’t part of the job description.
The journey through the galaxy is full of excitement, adventure, and mishaps for the Wayfarer team. And along the way, Rosemary comes to realize that a crew is a family, and that family isn’t necessarily the worst thing in the universe… as long as you actually like them.

My Review:

Let me start off by saying this book is awesome.  It is also so what I needed in my life right now reading-wise.  This was the exact sort of book I was looking for.  A science fiction character-driven novel with subtle social commentary.  Ahhh, like putting on a warm fuzzy sweater on a chilly morning.

There is was so much that was great about this book that I’m not quite sure where to begin.  I want to share it all with you, spoiler free, of course.  Let’s start with what I enjoyed most about this story.  The characters.  Hands down the diversity and personality of characters in this book were out of this world (ha, ha, space pun). We have a bit of everything in this book same-sex relationships, aliens that are not carbon copies of humans, the excentric off-the-wall-wondering-if-she-is-crazy-but-want-them-as-your-BFF character, the sour-puss, and so much more.  The diversity of character and species is reason enough to read this book.  I loved them all and enjoyed getting to know them and their backgrounds.

The next aspect of this story that worked for me is that it was a space opera.  If you are looking for a dry technical heavily political serious piece look elsewhere, however.  While this is a space opera science fiction is much more a character-driven story.  We get some science but nothing too technical.  It felt a bit like an extended Star Trek mission but better.  The species and space had more diversity and didn’t feel like they were all based on humanity and Earth only tweaked.  The author did an excellent job of putting thought into creating these new worlds and cultures.  You can also tell she worked hard to make them feel authentic too.

Then there is the subtle social commentary.  Oh, how I love a book that makes us take a good hard look at our society and question just what the hell are we doing.  Why do we have the problems, political and social, that we have?  Most of all I love a story that shows us another way.

This was a fantastic story, not about a crew on the ship Wayfarer but about a family.  A group of vastly different ‘people’ that came together and built a family.  Where everyone has their role and are needed to be complete.  I absolutely loved this story!

My Rating: 5 Stars

ARC Miniatures: The Very Short Fiction of John Scalzi by John Scalzi

Book Review

 


Miniatures: The Very Short Fiction of John ScalziBook Genre:Science Fiction, Short Stories, Humor

Book Series: N/A

Released: 12/31/16 by Subterranean Press

Pages: 144  Price:$40.00 (!) Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I received a copy of this book from the publisher through Net Galley for an honest review

 

 

Book Synopsis:

The ex-planet Pluto has a few choice words about being thrown out of the solar system. A listing of alternate histories tells you all the various ways Hitler has died. A lawyer sues an interplanetary union for dangerous working conditions. And four artificial intelligences explain, in increasingly worrying detail, how they plan not to destroy humanity.

Welcome to Miniatures: The Very Short Fiction of John Scalzi.

These four stories, along with fourteen other pieces, have one thing in common: They’re short, sharp, and to the point—science fiction in miniature, with none of the stories longer than 2,300 words. But in that short space exist entire universes, absurd situations, and the sort of futuristic humor that propelled Scalzi to a Hugo with his novel Redshirts. Not to mention yogurt taking over the world (as it would).

Spanning the years from 1991 to 2016, this collection is a quarter century of Scalzi at his briefest and best, and features four never-before-printed stories, exclusive to this collection: “Morning Announcements at the Lucas Interspecies School for Troubled Youth,” “Your Smart Appliances Talk About You Behind Your Back,” “Important Holidays on Gronghu” and “The AI Are Absolutely Positively Without a Doubt Not Here to End Humanity, Honest.”

My Review:

I am fairly new to the genius that is John Scalzi.  Redshirts was my first introduction, followed by Locked In and I have Old Man’s War signed and waiting for me up on my to-read bookcase.  I had an opportunity to met him in Chicago last spring after BEA and am so glad I did.  I love this man’s humor and writing style. When this book of short stories popped up for review on Net Galley I put in a request and promptly crossed my fingers in hope that I would be approved.  About a week later I received an email that it was waiting for me over on the site!  Made. My. Day.

Then life got in the way and having like two months to read this short collection of short stories I put it off for a month before diving in.  Most of the stories have been published someplace before and Mr. Scalzi gives us a little intro to each story sharing its inspiration or when in his writing history they came into being.  One of them even shares how you can find the story being read by Mr. Scalzi and his friend Wil Wheaton at a library on YouTube.  (How delightful! I had to watch it twice.)  This is simply a fun little book filled with witty stories from a great mind and I found myself laughing out loud as they brightened my day.

The only drawback to this book that I can see is the price.  It is listed as $40 for a hardcover version, but perhaps that will change.  I know it would have prevented me from picking up this one no matter how delightful it might be.  If it is too much for your budget to absorb I suggest suggesting it to your local library for purchase.  If you are a huge fan of Mr. Scalzi, though, and collect everything he has written then this is going to be a fabulous addition to your home library.

My Rating: 5 Stars

Secondhand Souls by Christopher Moore

Book Review

 


Secondhand Souls (Grim Reaper, #2)Book Genre: Fantasy, Humor, Paranormal 

Book Series: Grim Reaper #2

Released: 8/25/15 by William Morrow

Pages: 335 Price: $26.99 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book: Amazon Secondhand Souls: A Novel

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library.  

 

 

Book Synopsis:

In San Francisco, the souls of the dead are mysteriously disappearing—and you know that can’t be good—in New York Times bestselling author Christopher Moore’s delightfully funny sequel to A Dirty Job.

Something really strange is happening in the City by the Bay. People are dying, but their souls are not being collected. Someone—or something—is stealing them and no one knows where they are going, or why, but it has something to do with that big orange bridge. Death Merchant Charlie Asher is just as flummoxed as everyone else. He’s trapped in the body of a fourteen-inch-tall “meat” waiting for his Buddhist nun girlfriend, Audrey, to find him a suitable new body to play host.

To get to the bottom of this abomination, a motley crew of heroes will band together: the seven-foot-tall death merchant Minty Fresh; retired policeman turned bookseller Alphonse Rivera; the Emperor of San Francisco and his dogs, Bummer and Lazarus; and Lily, the former Goth girl. Now if only they can get little Sophie to stop babbling about the coming battle for the very soul of humankind…

My Review:

Earlier this year I listed to the first book in this short series, A Dirty Job, and quite liked it.  Decided to put book two on my wish list at my library and this week it became available. I was a bit hesitant when starting this book as a good chunk of the reviews are less than favorable over on Goodreads.  Since I needed something to listen to while working on a project and this book looking the most promising of those available to me I decided to give it a shot.

I’m glad I did because I thought it was a charming little story.  Most of the characters I loved in the first book were back and we got to deal with the leftover issue of what happen to Charlie.  It is the characters that make this world for me. Their quirkiness, the foul language, and even the stereotypes have grown on me.  Again there was a pleasant mix of humor, drama, and mystery to keep me listening.  In fact, this is perhaps one of the fastest listens I have experienced with an audiobook.  Partially due to its length but mostly due to the story kept me coming back.

Only having read/listened to two of this author’s books I can not say if this is typical of his style or not.  If it is, though, I can tell there are plenty of good books waiting for me to make time for them.  The style is a little quirky and way snarky in dialog but a whole lot of fun.  Not a lot I can find fault with in this one.  Maybe a little heavy-handed with the language at times, definitely not safe for work or children of any age.  I liked it but didn’t love it so it gets the same rating as the first book in the series.  This one feels like a finally but if another shows up in this world I will make room for it on my to-read shelf.

My Rating: 4 Stars

Top Ten Tuesday: LOL

Top Ten Tuesday

 

Welcome to another contribution to the wildly popular blog meme Top Ten Tuesday hosted by The Broke and The Bookish.  This week they ask us to share lists on the following:

April 19: Ten Books That Will Make You Laugh (or at least chuckle)

Okay I think I recently did a freebie week on books to make you laugh, so I will strive to find some books or authors that might not have made it onto that list, but please be aware that there will be crossover because I’m tired today and just want to get this list posted so I can tackle the next item on my to-do list.  (Upon further research it appears I have not done a funny list recently, but still expect some crossover) 

Ten books to make you laugh out loud.

or

Warning:Do not read in public.

  1. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #1) Just to make sure we don’t have all paranormal books on this list I decided to add this funny yet odd modern classic.  From what I’ve seen people either get this type of humor or they don’t I think it is hilarious and enjoyed this read immensely.
  2. I'm the Vampire, That's Why (Broken Heart #1) While browsing through my read shelf on Goodreads I came across this author that I’ve not read in a while.  She is very funny and I particularly enjoyed this series.  The earlier books are better so just walk away when you aren’t enjoying them anymore.
  3. First Grave on the Right (Charley Davidson, #1) Another funny series that I shouldn’t read in public.  Again the earlier books are much funnier than the later ones which take a more serious tone to them.  Still funny, but just dialed down a notch.
  4. Redshirts While this wasn’t always laugh out loud funny as a fan of Star Trek I found much delight in this story within a story that poked all kinds of fun at my beloved Trek franchise.
  5. The Rosie Project (Don Tillman, #1) I discovered this series through Top Ten Tuesday lists.  It was billed as a good read for fans of Big Bang Theory and it sure did deliver.  Again more cute than ha ha, but still a funny read.
  6. The Martian Okay you all know my love of this one.  I’ve worked hard to keep it off the lists lately, but for a week of funny reads I can not not include it.  This book is so sarcastic and literally laugh out loud funny that it had me following my husband around the house reading excerpts from it.  Probably the funniest book on the list.  Read THIS one.
  7. The Accidental Vampire (Argeneau #7) This series is another one that has made many a TTT list.  The books fall into one of two types, either more serious action or crazy hilarious situations.  This is book seven which is one of the crazy situations reads.  Lots of fun.
  8. You Slay Me (Aisling Grey #1) This author cracks me up.  Her style works better for the paranormal genre as I am not a fan of her contemporary heroines, but man she knows how to make you laugh and steam up your glasses.
  9. Nice Girls Don't Have Fangs (Jane Jameson, #1) This is another author that has funny down to a science.  The chemistry between characters is authentic and makes you wish you could be part of their gang.
  10. The Good Samaritan Strikes Again Okay to end with something different.  I believe I’ve mentioned this author before.  I used to read these short stories out loud to my dad (who was blind) and could not make it through one of these without loosing it.  If you are familiar with rural life, hunting & fishing or camping then give this author a try I bet you enjoy him too.

F*ck That by Jason Headley

Book Review

 


fckthatBook Genre:
 Non-Fiction, Humor

Book Series: Stand Alone

Released: 4/12/16 by Three Rivers Press

Pages: 65  Price: $14.00 Hardcover

Links: More Info, Goodreads

Source: I received a copy of this book from the publisher through the Blogging for Books program for an honest review

 

Book Synopsis:

We all have an inner voice. Sometimes it’s just not quite as serene as we’d like. 
 
Based on the viral video that had everyone from yogis to workaholics raving, F*ck That is the completely truthful and oddly tranquil guide to achieving your inner peace.

My Review:

This is a cute little book and quite clever.  Not very long, perhaps a bit pricey at $14, but still very giftable.  The pictures inside are simply beautiful and juxtaposed with the humorous text (chock full of naughty words btw) made me want to read it twice.  Once to focus on the script and next to look at the lovely pictures.  This book would be perfect for someone who works in a difficult environment and could use a laugh.  In all honestly though while the book is making a joke we all should take to heart the message of something are just not worth the drama we let them create in our lives.  I’m happy I requested this book.  It made me smile and I hope it does my husband as well because next time he has a crappy day at work I’m going to leave this for him on his desk and hopefully it will brighten his day.

My Rating: 4 Stars