Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Book Review

 


Ready Player OneBook Genre: Science Fiction, Dystopian, Audiobook

Book Series: N/A

Released: 8/16/11 by Crown Publishers

Pages: 374 Price: $26.00 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed a copy of this audiobook from my library

 

 

Book Synopsis:

In the year 2044, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he’s jacked into the virtual utopia known as the  OASIS. Wade’s devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world’s digital confines, puzzles that are based on their creator’s obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them. When Wade stumbles upon the first clue, he finds himself beset by players willing to kill to take this ultimate prize. The race is on, and if Wade’s going to survive, he’ll have to win—and confront the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.

My Review:

Wow, I really enjoyed this book!  Totally surprised me because I ended up DNFing this author’s second book Armada.  That one I found just annoying and a bit boring with all the insider info geared towards gamers.  This book, on the other hand, was a delight and a fun nostalgic trip to all things pop culture from the 80’s, the decade I spent most of my pre-teen and teens in.

I totally agree with another reviewer in that Wil Wheaton made this book for me!  Listening to him narrate this story was such a trip, especially when the story referenced him and anything Trek.  Being that this story is about a group of players searching for the ultimate Easter Egg inside a game to have so much of the story is essentially one giant Easter Egg was amazing. At almost every turn there was some pop reference that made me smile.

But that isn’t all that Ready Player One is about, oh no, there is much more to be had in this tale.  There is also a great social commentary on where our society might be headed if we don’t change our ways.  We get a glimpse at what might await us if we don’t start taking climate change seriously or stop rampant corporate greed.  I also enjoyed the ideas about where technology might be headed that the author proposed.

The last leg of this story focused on a small band of misfits struggling to fit in, in this world.  Outcasts that live their lives mainly online and struggle with social interactions.  Not to mention a budding romance that was beyond sweet.  The characters, like in any epic tale, are true heroes out to fight for the greater good.

I thoroughly enjoyed listening to this book.  I’m not sure I would have felt the same way if I had read it myself though.  Wil Wheaton’s inflection and talent as an actor added that something extra that bumped this story up an entire star for me.  So if you have the option I would definitely listen to this one.

My Rating: 5 Stars

Wicked Appetite by Janet Evanovich

Book Review

 


Wicked Appetite (Lizzy & Diesel, #1)Book Genre: Mystery, Paranormal, Humor, Fantasy, Audiobook

Book Series: Lizzy & Diesel #1

Released: 9/14/10 by St. Martin’s Press

Pages: 313  Price: $27.99 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library.

 

 

Book Synopsis:

For centuries, treasure hunters have been eager to possess the stones, undeterred by their corrupting nature. The list is long — Genghis Khan, Alexander the Great, Napoleon, to name a few. Now the Stones have found their way to Salem, Massachusetts, and so has Gerwulf Grimoire, adding himself to this rogues’ gallery of power seekers. He’s an uncommonly dangerous man, with a hunger for the forbidden, and a set of abilities that are way beyond ordinary. Abilities that he feels entitle him to possess anything he might desire.

That would include Elizabeth Tucker, the woman he needs to find the Stones. She’s freshly transplanted from New York City to Boston’s North Shore. With a new job as pastry chef at Dazzle’s bakery and an old house inherited from her Aunt Ophelia, her life is pretty much on track …until it’s suddenly derailed by a guy named Diesel, a rude monkey, and a ninja cat.

Lizzy can handle the monkey and the cat. She’s not sure about Diesel. He’s offering up his own set of unusual talents, promising to protect her from Grimoire. The kind of protection that Lizzy suspects might involve guarding her body day and night.

The Seven Deadly Sins are pride, greed, lust, envy wrath, sloth and gluttony. That pretty much covers everything that is wicked. Diesel thinks it also pretty much covers everything that’s fun. And Lizzy thinks Diesel and the Seven Deadly Sins cover everything her mother warned her about.

My Review:

Full disclosure, I only checked this book out so that there would be an E author on my reviewed index page on my blog.  I only need a U and an X author now.  For some reason, I’m not a big fan of Ms. Evanovich.  I know people love her and we have library patrons that loyally check out and devour each new release in her Stephanie Pulm series.

This wasn’t bad, I enjoyed listening to it more than the other series, probably because of the supernatural element to the story.  There are moments of humor but on the whole, I found the female lead kind of annoying. Diesel was an alright male lead but he just lacked chemistry in my opinion.  The monkey was over the top but I loved the one-eyed cat.

Basically, this story is the beginning of a supernatural series full of immature humor and low-level sexual tension.  If I am ever desperate for another audiobook I might listen to the next book but probably not.  There are far better, far funnier paranormal mystery series out there and I would suggest trying the Charley Davidson series instead.

My Rating: 2 Stars

Yesterday’s Son by A.C. Crispin

Book Review

 


Yesterday's Son (Star Trek: The Yesterday Saga, #1)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Star Trek, Fantasy, TV Tie-in

Book Series: Star Trek: The Original Series #11

Released: 8/1/1983 by Pocket Books

Pages: 192  Price: $4.99

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I own a copy of this book. 

 

 

Book Synopsis:

With the help of the Vulcan leader T’Pau, Spock gets permission to use the Guardian of Forever, a portal through time constructed by a long-vanished race, to venture into the past. On another trip into history, on the planet Sarpeidon, Spock had loved a woman who could not return with him to the future, and now Spock wishes to see the son she bore him, 5,000 years earlier. But a Romulan attack on the Guardian’s planet could interfere, unless the Enterprise can keep the Guardian out of their hands.

My Review:

This is the first Star Trek book I ever read.  It must have been my early teen years, maybe 30 years ago, when I picked this one up at the bookstore.  Much of the plot was forgotten, only a few parts stuck in my memory.  I’m not sure what ever happen to that copy but when I picked up the sequel through a book exchange site I decided to read it again.  I also recently watched the tv episode that the events this book are based upon.  So the timing was perfect to revisit a piece of my childhood and my love of all things Trek.

This was such a good book.  I am probably bias here but I loved this book it is by far my favorite Trek book that I’ve read.  Ms. Crispin does an excellent job of capturing the chemistry and personalities of the characters it was exactly like reading an episode from the original series, only better!  Better because you get to be in the head of Spock, Kirk, and Bones,  you get to read the internal dialog of the characters.

As to the plot of this book I was totally engrossed I have never wanted to sit two characters down for a talking to as I did while reading this book.  Maybe even smack them upside the head…  I’m glad there is a second book because while I am satisfied with the ending it was so bitter-sweet, I wanted more for these two. Like I said the book read much like the tv series so if you enjoyed the show you should like this book.  If you were a fan of Spock then you are really going to love this one!  Looking forward to the next.

My Rating:5 Stars

The Long War by Terry Pratchett & Stephen Baxter

Book Review

 


The Long War (The Long Earth, #2)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Fantasy

Book Series: The Long Earth #2

Released: 6/18/13 by HarperCollins

Pages:426  Price: $9.99 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library.

 

 

Book Synopsis:

A generation after the events of The Long Earth, mankind has spread across the new worlds opened up by Stepping. Where Joshua and Lobsang once pioneered, now fleets of airships link the stepwise Americas with trade and culture. Mankind is shaping the Long Earth – but in turn the Long Earth is shaping mankind… A new ‘America’, called Valhalla, is emerging more than a million steps from Datum Earth, with core American values restated in the plentiful environment of the Long Earth – and Valhalla is growing restless under the control of the Datum government…

Meanwhile the Long Earth is suffused by the song of the trolls, graceful hive-mind humanoids. But the trolls are beginning to react to humanity’s thoughtless exploitation… Joshua, now a married man, is summoned by Lobsang to deal with a gathering multiple crisis that threatens to plunge the Long Earth into a war unlike any mankind has waged before.

My Review:

While I am enjoying this series I have to agree with other criticism that has been made about this book.  That this is an interesting story that is fairly lacking in plot.  The authors have a point (I hope) and seem to feel that it is going to take hundreds of pages and several volumes to get to the heart of the action.  Also, much of this second book feels as if it is simply setting up future books.  Not the first time, and probably not the last, that a second book simply feels like filler.

I had trouble getting into this second book mainly because I had to wait so long for my turn at the library’s copy.  If I had been able to dive right into this one after the first I might have had an easier time remembering who carried over from the first book and who was new.  Around half-way through I was invested enough in this storyline that it didn’t matter that much and I could follow what was going on.

Still, I did enjoy listening to this book as the authors continue to bring up interesting questions of what makes a society, or makes us human, and what would happen if the people were truly free.  The technology continues to fascinate me as well as the idea of exploring parallel Earths with slightly changing variables in its environment, history, and development.  The characters continue to be well-developed and I spend much of the time thinking who they might represent in our own society.  Even though this book was written in 2013 I have to say who the authors wrote as the President reminds me an awful lot of who is our current President-elect…  Not a pleasant indicator of what our country might be in for in the next four-year.

Even though this story felt as if it was all over the place, though still interesting, I am going to continue for one more book at least (last one offered in audio format at my library).  I did get my act together and requested it before finishing this book and able to start right away.  I’m going to see if that makes a difference or not.

My Rating:3 Stars

Zoe’s Tale by John Scalzi

Book Review

 


Zoe's Tale (Old Man's War, #4)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Space Opera, Fantasy

Book Series: Old Man’s War

Released: 8/19/08 by Tor

Pages: 355 Price: $8.99 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed a copy of this book from my library.

 

 

Book Synopsis:

How do you tell your part in the biggest tale in history?

I ask because it’s what I have to do. I’m Zoe Boutin Perry: A colonist stranded on a deadly pioneer world. Holy icon to a race of aliens. A player (and a pawn) in a interstellar chess match to save humanity, or to see it fall. Witness to history. Friend. Daughter. Human. Seventeen years old.

Everyone on Earth knows the tale I am part of. But you don’t know my tale: How I did what I did — how I did what I had to do — not just to stay alive but to keep you alive, too. All of you. I’m going to tell it to you now, the only way I know how: not straight but true, the whole thing, to try make you feel what I felt: the joy and terror and uncertainty, panic and wonder, despair and hope. Everything that happened, bringing us to Earth, and Earth out of its captivity. All through my eyes.

It’s a story you know. But you don’t know it all.

My Review:

I have mixed feelings about his addition to the Old Man’s War series.  I did like it but just a little less than the others I’ve read so far.  I have a couple of theories as to why that I will go into in a bit.  I’m glad I read it, however, and would suggest if this is your first time through the series that you do as well.  If I ever decide to reread this series I will probably skip this one, though.

So what held me back from loving this book.  The big issue for me was that this is the same story as the previous book but from a different POV.  While it did shed some light on the action that wasn’t shared in the other book what I just feel like I wouldn’t have missed much by not reading this one.  The other drawback for me was that is a YA book, it reads like YA, I found it annoying like YA… I’m over YA at this point in my life.

That being said, I did find it fascinating that Scalzi did an amazing job of channeling a 17-year-old girl.  Kudos to him.  The drama and angst that he showed through his writing is spot on.   A couple of new scenes dealing with Zoe’s boyfriend were simply heartbreaking and seeing what happen when she left the plant near the end were worth the read.  I don’t know if it needed to read a whole second book to get to those parts, however.

The book did make me want to take a break from the series.  The format is changing for the remaining two books, they were written as serial releases, and I think taking a break and then coming back to this world might make it easier to accept any new changes in formatting coming my way.  I still plan to finish up the series but just not right now.

My Rating: 3 Stars

The Last Colony by John Scalzi

Book Review

 


The Last Colony (Old Man's War #3)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Space Opera, Fantasy

Book Series: Old Man’s War #3

Released: 4/17/2007 by Tor Books

Pages: 320  Price: $7.99 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed a copy of this book from my library.

 

 

Book Synopsis:

Retired from his fighting days, John Perry is now village ombudsman for a human colony on distant Huckleberry. With his wife, former Special Forces warrior Jane Sagan, he farms several acres, adjudicates local disputes, and enjoys watching his adopted daughter grow up.

That is, until his and Jane’s past reaches out to bring them back into the game–as leaders of a new human colony, to be peopled by settlers from all the major human worlds, for a deep political purpose that will put Perry and Sagan back in the thick of interstellar politics, betrayal, and war.

My Review:

I continue to work my way through this amazing series and simply marvel at the genius and talent of John Scalzi.  Wow. This author’s work is blowing me away.  To think I met him and did not yet know the magnitude of the work I had yet to enjoy.  Facepalm time.  I am both delighted and horrified that I have the last three books in this series lined up and waiting to be read, I don’t think I will want it to end.

This book brought us back to John and Jane as they have carved out a nice little life for themselves among the colonies. They quickly find themselves drafted back into the war as they become pawns of the colonial defense force.  Again Scalzi does a bang up job of showing us just how crappy humans can be, especially humans that want to keep their corrupt war industry going.

This book gives us everything I love about Scalzi; humor, action with consequences, corruption, honor, and hope.  He takes us on a journey and shows us all sides of the human condition while entertaining us along the way. My main complaint about the book is one plot thread that seemed to go nowhere (indigenous creatures).  Otherwise, this book was pretty awesome.  It did have the feeling of finality to it, almost like he meant this one to be the last and if you are tired of long series you could totally leave this world here and be satisfied.  I, on the other hand, am enjoying the ride so I’m going to stick it out for the next three books (I ordered them already anyway…).

This isn’t a light and fluffy read, there is depth to this series.  But still, if you are simply looking for something entertaining don’t let that stop you.  Hands down this is simply an excellent read no matter how you approach it.  This author is has become one of my favorites.

My Rating: 5 Stars

The Ghost Brigades by John Scalzi

Book Review

 


The Ghost Brigades (Old Man's War, #2)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Fantasy, Space Opera

Book Series: Old Man’s War #2

Released: 5/1/2007 by Tor 

Pages: 347  Price:$7.99 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, http://whatever.scalzi.com/Author’s Site

Source: I own a copy of this book.

 

 

Book Synopsis:

The Ghost Brigades are the Special Forces of the Colonial Defense Forces, elite troops created from the DNA of the dead and turned into the perfect soldiers for the CDF’s toughest operations. They’re young, they’re fast and strong, and they’re totally without normal human qualms.

The universe is a dangerous place for humanity—and it’s about to become far more dangerous. Three races that humans have clashed with before have allied to halt our expansion into space. Their linchpin: the turncoat military scientist Charles Boutin, who knows the CDF’s biggest military secrets. To prevail, the CDF must find out why Boutin did what he did.

Jared Dirac is the only human who can provide answers — a superhuman hybrid, created from Boutin’s DNA, Jared’s brain should be able to access Boutin’s electronic memories. But when the memory transplant appears to fail, Jared is given to the Ghost Brigades.

At first, Jared is a perfect soldier, but as Boutin’s memories slowly surface, Jared begins to intuit the reason’s for Boutin’s betrayal. As Jared desperately hunts for his “father,” he must also come to grips with his own choices. Time is running out: The alliance is preparing its offensive, and some of them plan worse things than humanity’s mere military defeat…

My Review:

There is quite a bit going on plot-wise in this story that I’m glad I’m reading these back to back.  I think in the end it will lead to a richer understanding of not just the story but the greater message that Scalzi is trying to convey through this world.  Because there is most definitely a message or lesson to be found in this world and I wish more people, especially in the current political environment, would read this author’s work.

This story takes place a few years after the first book and is told from the perspective of one of the special forces soldiers.  We also get inside the heads of a couple other characters as well, which is a deviation from the first book which is told from John’s perspective exclusively (I think).  Jane who has a brief, but important, role in the last book is more center stage in book two and by the end you can see pretty plainly how Scalzi is setting up the next story.

Lots of background and politics regarding the Ghost Brigade soldiers in this plot that brings up all kinds of interesting questions about humanity, discrimination, and the bounds of government control, all things I like to ponder being a political junky that I am, of course being a work of fiction we are also entertained.  I have to say, though,  at times Scalzi makes it awfully hard to root for humanity in this world.  He still does an excellent job of shining a big old spotlight at some of our darker aspects of humanity.  There was one scene where I just had to put the book down and collect myself for a moment.  A sure sign of a talented author if you ask me.  I get so wrapped up in the personalities and relationships that I forget the main setting of this book is a universe at war and most of the time that isn’t pretty or safe.

I am looking forward to the next two books and will most likely be ordering the last two next time I go to work so I don’t have to wait.  This is such a rich world, sometimes a bit slow, and definitely not fluff.  I hope you all give this one a chance it is so worth the read.

My Rating:4 Stars

The Long Earth by Terry Pratchet, Stephen Baxter

 

Book Review

 


The Long Earth (The Long Earth, #1)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Fantasy, Audiobook

Book Series: The Long Earth #1

Released: 6/19/12 by HarperCollins

Pages: 336  Price$ 25.99 hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Terry Pratchett, Stephen Baxter

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library. 

 

Book Synopsis:

NORMALLY, WHEN THERE WAS NOTHING TO DO, HE LISTENED TO THE SILENCE.

The Silence was very faint here. Almost drowned out by the sounds of the mundane world. Did people in this polished building understand how noisy it was? The roar of air conditioners and computer fans, the susurration of many voices heard but not decipherable…. This was the office of the transEarth Institute, an arm of the Black Corporation. The faceless office, all plasterboard and chrome, was dominated by a huge logo, a chesspiece knight. This wasn’t Joshua’s world. None of it was his world. In fact, when you got right down to it, he didn’t have a world; he had all of them.

ALL OF THE LONG EARTH.

From the inside jacket:

The possibilites are endless. Just be careful what you wish for….)

1916: The Western Front. Private Percy Blakeney wakes up. He is lying on fresh spring grass. He can hear birdsong, and the wind in the leaves. Where has the mud, blood and blasted landscape of no-man’s-land gone? For that matter, where has Percy gone?

2015: Madison, Wisconsin. Police officer Monica Jansson is exploring the burned-out home of a reclusive–some said mad, others allege dangerous–scientist who seems to have vanished. Sifting through the wreckage, Jansson finds a curious gadget: a box containing some rudimentary wiring, a three-way switch, and…a potato. It is the prototype of an invention that will change the way humankind views the world forever.

The first novel in an exciting new collaboration between Discworld creator Terry Pratchett and the acclaimed SF writer Stephen Baxter, The Long Earth transports readers to the ends of the earth and far beyond. All it takes is a single step….

My Review:

I must be in a science fiction mood lately.  The only books that are pulling my attention and keeping me interested are of that genre, so instead of fighting it I am going to go with it and put the romances and vampires on the back-burner for a while.  Having stumbled upon Pratchett’s work recently when this one came up available through my library I decided to give it a shot.  I am not familiar with Baxter’s work but will have to check into his titles soon.  I see from Goodreads that this book has mixed reviews but it did win the reader’s choice award in 2012.  After finishing it and desperately wanting to dive into the next I am going to go with the notion that this book deserved the award.

I loved this.  It was just smart enough science wise that I could see the deeper theories that the story was based upon but it didn’t delve in so far that I felt stupid.  Essentially the authors took the idea of parallel dimensions in string theory and said what if.  What we ended up with was a fascinating story and journey into a world where another Earth is simply a step away.  Now some people have claimed that this story was a little slow but I didn’t find it that way.  I enjoyed the constant idea of if this didn’t happen then the Earth might be this way.  Then to see what might happen to the human race if other worlds were open up and the consequences it might bring.  Sure it would be amazing to explore everything but being humans we would surely muck everything up or suddenly the powers that be would no longer be the powers that be.  Simply fascinating story that had me thinking about the possibilities of what might happen.  The characters were well done too, perhaps a little heavy-handed at times but in the whole, I didn’t find anyone overly objectionable.  The “artificial” life was another interesting aspect and I hope to see him in future books.  I don’t think all his cards have yet to be played.

I’m glad I listed to this one as the narrator did a nice job with the accents, although his female was a bit off.  Tough to make a believable sounding opposite gender, though, I’m finding.  My only complaint is that this book ended with a freaking huge cliffhanger and now I have to wait for my turn at the next one.  That’s okay because I have another book I waiting on in another science fiction series and I honestly don’t know which one I want to follow first.  Take some of the criticism with a grain of salt and just let yourself get lost in this world I think you might be surprised at what a good story it is.  If not, then you can always DNF and step into another world.

My Rating: 5 Stars

Secondhand Souls by Christopher Moore

Book Review

 


Secondhand Souls (Grim Reaper, #2)Book Genre: Fantasy, Humor, Paranormal 

Book Series: Grim Reaper #2

Released: 8/25/15 by William Morrow

Pages: 335 Price: $26.99 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library.  

 

 

Book Synopsis:

In San Francisco, the souls of the dead are mysteriously disappearing—and you know that can’t be good—in New York Times bestselling author Christopher Moore’s delightfully funny sequel to A Dirty Job.

Something really strange is happening in the City by the Bay. People are dying, but their souls are not being collected. Someone—or something—is stealing them and no one knows where they are going, or why, but it has something to do with that big orange bridge. Death Merchant Charlie Asher is just as flummoxed as everyone else. He’s trapped in the body of a fourteen-inch-tall “meat” waiting for his Buddhist nun girlfriend, Audrey, to find him a suitable new body to play host.

To get to the bottom of this abomination, a motley crew of heroes will band together: the seven-foot-tall death merchant Minty Fresh; retired policeman turned bookseller Alphonse Rivera; the Emperor of San Francisco and his dogs, Bummer and Lazarus; and Lily, the former Goth girl. Now if only they can get little Sophie to stop babbling about the coming battle for the very soul of humankind…

My Review:

Earlier this year I listed to the first book in this short series, A Dirty Job, and quite liked it.  Decided to put book two on my wish list at my library and this week it became available. I was a bit hesitant when starting this book as a good chunk of the reviews are less than favorable over on Goodreads.  Since I needed something to listen to while working on a project and this book looking the most promising of those available to me I decided to give it a shot.

I’m glad I did because I thought it was a charming little story.  Most of the characters I loved in the first book were back and we got to deal with the leftover issue of what happen to Charlie.  It is the characters that make this world for me. Their quirkiness, the foul language, and even the stereotypes have grown on me.  Again there was a pleasant mix of humor, drama, and mystery to keep me listening.  In fact, this is perhaps one of the fastest listens I have experienced with an audiobook.  Partially due to its length but mostly due to the story kept me coming back.

Only having read/listened to two of this author’s books I can not say if this is typical of his style or not.  If it is, though, I can tell there are plenty of good books waiting for me to make time for them.  The style is a little quirky and way snarky in dialog but a whole lot of fun.  Not a lot I can find fault with in this one.  Maybe a little heavy-handed with the language at times, definitely not safe for work or children of any age.  I liked it but didn’t love it so it gets the same rating as the first book in the series.  This one feels like a finally but if another shows up in this world I will make room for it on my to-read shelf.

My Rating: 4 Stars

The Traveler by John Twelve Hawks

Book Review

 


The Traveler (Fourth Realm, #1)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Thriller, Dystopian, Fantasy, Audiobook

Book Series: Fourth Realm #1

Released: 7/18/2006 by Vintage

Pages:  464 Price: $15.95 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audio book from my library.

 

 

Book Synopsis:

In London, Maya, a young woman trained to fight by her powerful father, uses the latest technology to elude detection when walking past the thousands of surveillance cameras that watch the city. In New York, a secret shadow organization uses a victim’s own GPS to hunt him down and kill him. In Los Angeles, Gabriel, a motorcycle messenger with a haunted past, takes pains to live “off the grid” – free of credit cards and government IDs. Welcome to the world of The Traveler – a world frighteningly like our own.In this compelling novel, Maya fights to save Gabriel, the only man who can stand against the forces that attempt to monitor and control society. From the back streets of Prague to the skyscrapers of Manhattan, The Travelerportrays an epic struggle between tyranny and freedom. Not since 1984 have readers witnessed a Big Brother so terrifying in its implications and in a story that so closely reflects our lives.

My Review:

With the populous, anti-establishment mood of the country, this book was a fitting for not only my current mood but the climate in which I find myself living in.  This work of fiction was written in 2006,  a couple of years before the great crash in the last years of the Bush Presidency and before Obama took office.  Having just woken up to the systematic corruption of both political parties so much of what this book talks about, albeit fictionally, rings true to the society we now find ourselves living in.  A world where we are controlled and manipulated all to wring the highest profit for those that control all branches of government with their donations.

Okay, all of that aside, this was a thrill ride of a story that felt like a cross between The Matrix, The Da Vinci Code, and a James Bond film.  You get rich characters, secret societies, conspiracy theories, action, and a little mysticism to boot. Spanning Europe and the United States we follow the main characters Maya, Gabriel, and Micheal as they are thrust into this secret world going on around them as they discover plots and corruption as they race to protect Gabriel and Micheal who might be the last Travelers in existence and seek vengeance for those that they have lost.

I’m glad I listened to this one for the introduction and ending interview with the author which I found just as interesting as the story itself.  Granted I think the ploy of writing this under a pen name is just that a ploy to attract attention, I have to say it worked on me.  It added to the mystery and cloak and dagger feel of this story.  Convincing me to take a moment and actually think about the themes talked about in this work of fiction and wonder what might actually apply to the world we now live in.  Sadly I think many of those themes are probably pretty applicable and it makes me want to fight the system.

Bottom line this was a good book with an entertaining story that might make you think a bit afterward.  Even if you don’t buy into the conspiracy theory aspect it is still a good listen, especially if you like books by Dan Brown or David Baldacci or even the dystopian genre with a bit of the supernatural thrown in.  I eagerly await the next title in this trilogy that I have put on hold with my library.  I can’t wait to see how this all plays out.

My Rating: 5 Stars