The Fate of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

Book Review


The Fate of the Tearling (The Queen of the Tearling, #3)Book Genre: Fantasy, Science Fiction, Dystopian, Paranormal

Book Series: The Queen of the Tearling #3

Released: 11/29/16 by Harper

Pages:  496 Price: $25.99 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library



Book Synopsis:

In less than a year, Kelsea Glynn has grown from an awkward teenager into a powerful monarch and a visionary leader.

And as she has come into her own as the Queen of the Tearling, she has transformed her realm. But in her quest to end corruption and restore justice, she has made many enemies – chief among them the evil and feared Red Queen, who ordered the armies of Mortmesne to march against the Tear and crush them.

To protect her people from such a devastating invasion, Kelsea did the unthinkable – naming the Mace, the trusted head of her personal guards, Regent in her place, she surrendered herself and her magical sapphires to her enemy. But the Mace will not rest until he and his men rescue their sovereign from her prison in Mortmesne.

So, the endgame has begun and the fate of Queen Kelsea – and the Tearling itself – will be revealed…

My Review:

Wow, that was quite the ending!  It was well worth the wait for my turn to find out what happened.  If you’ve been frustrated with so many of the looming questions left unanswered in the first two books I am pleased to report that most if not all of them were answered in the final book in this trilogy. Like others have mentioned the ending was a bit abrupt but it didn’t really disappoint or frustrate me I guess.  Oh sure, I want to know more about Kelsea’s life afterward but I’m fine filling in my own details of what I imagine life has in store for her.

This book worked so well for me that it almost lifts up my opinion of earlier books.  Now that I KNOW what all happened it all makes so much more sense.  This story has so much to offer that I almost want to listen to it all over again to truly grasp the morality lessons it delivered.  Like the story, itself states works of fiction teach us empathy and hold up a mirror to our society and allow us to take a good hard look at ourselves.

The themes that I particularly enjoyed in this trilogy are the examples of extremism and fanaticism.  Also of what happens when the church takes over a society.  I almost wish that the author hadn’t solved these problems with magic but it is what it is.  Then there is the whole plot of a utopian society gone wrong that was a pure delight to explore.  The story shows us why you simply can’t run away from problems for they will simply follow you.  Change is a long and hard road with no easy answers to complex issues and can not be had without great sacrifice.

There were a few surprises near the end and a couple of things I would have done differently but overall I was so satisfied when I finished this story that I can’t even fault the story over them.  The last book ended up being my favorite which doesn’t often happen in trilogies.  Sorry that the trilogy is finished but happy that I took the time for it.

My Rating: 5 stars


If Tomorrow Comes by Nancy Kress

Book Review


If Tomorrow Comes (Yesterday's Kin, #2)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Dystopian

Book Series: Yesterday’s Kin Trilogy

Released: 3/6/2018 by Tor Book

Pages: 336 Price: $27.99 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.  



Book Synopsis:

Ten years after the Aliens left Earth, humanity has succeeded in building a ship, Friendship, in which to follow them home to Kindred. Aboard are a crew of scientists, diplomats, and a squad of Rangers to protect them. But when the Friendship arrives, they find nothing they expected. No interplanetary culture, no industrial base–and no cure for the spore disease.

A timeslip in the apparently instantaneous travel between worlds has occurred and far more than ten years have passed.

Once again scientists find themselves in a race against time to save humanity and their kind from a deadly virus while a clock of a different sort runs down on a military solution no less deadly to all. Amid devastation and plague come stories of heroism and sacrifice and of genetic destiny and free choice, with its implicit promise of conscious change.

My Review:

When I was given the opportunity to read and review the upcoming release from the Yesterday’s Kin Trilogy I jumped all over it.  I loved the first book! I appreciate the complex characters, moral dilemmas, and real science (as far as my liberal arts educated mind can tell) that Ms. Kress uses to weave her story.  So I cleared my reading calendar and sat down to see what happen next in If Tomorrow Comes.

If you are or have picked up this book without reading the first in the trilogy I think that you will be alright.  I still encourage you to go back and read that first book but I think you will still appreciate this story.  It could almost work as a stand-alone title if it wasn’t for the freaking cliffhanger at the end.

I have to confess that while I enjoyed this book I loved it a bit less than the first.  Still dealing with great topics but the book got a little bogged down in the middle.  I managed to zip through the first hundred pages but after a short break to finish another book (due back at my library) I struggled with the second half a bit.  Of course, that could be attributed to interrupted reading time.  Every time the story started getting good again I had to set it down.

What I loved about this book; the chance to explore a human society that developed vastly different from humans on earth.  Almost an opportunity to see how we could have been without many of the societal hangups we have here on Earth.  Of course, being the humans we are we still manage to muck up this other world with our influence.  I did appreciate how Kress didn’t make this other human race a utopian society.  It had its own share of issues but compared to the current state of our society it sure fell like a vast improvement.

I think what hurt this story the most for me was a character for me to truly connect with.  There were several I definitely didn’t care for but there wasn’t really anyone I really rooting for.  Perhaps humanity as a whole, but it wasn’t quite enough.  The end of the book managed to wrap things up nicely and if I had ended the story a chapter or two early I could have walked away satisfied and ready to move on.  But I didn’t and that last chapter reached out an grabbed me and now I anxiously away the next book to see how this trilogy ends.  I need to know what happens next and I think you will too!

My Rating: 4 Stars

Ready Player One by Ernst Cline (reread)

Book Review


Book Genre: Science Fiction, Dystopian

Book Series: Ready Player One #1

Released:1/16/2018 by Crown Publishers

Pages: 374 Price: $16.00 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I received a copy of this book from the publisher through Blogging for Books



Book Synopsis:

In the year 2045, reality is an ugly place. The only time teenage Wade Watts really feels alive is when he’s jacked into the virtual utopia known as the OASIS. Wade’s devoted his life to studying the puzzles hidden within this world’s digital confines, puzzles that are based on their creator’s obsession with the pop culture of decades past and that promise massive power and fortune to whoever can unlock them. When Wade stumbles upon the first clue, he finds himself beset by players willing to kill to take this ultimate prize. The race is on, and if Wade’s going to survive, he’ll have to win—and confront the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.

My Review:

Confession time.  I had already read this book when I requested it or rather I had listened to it.  I borrowed the audiobook from my library a while back but had wanted to read it again before seeing the movie.  I loved listening to it the first time as it is narrated by Wil Wheaton who quite frankly made the book truly come alive for me.  I had been toying with adding the title to my home library and when I saw the movie tie-in version come up for review I went for it and put in a request.

I’m happy to report that reading the book was just as delightful as listening to it.  It really does surprise me that this book works for me when I struggle so much with his second title Armada.   This book, however, is such a fun trip down nostalgia lane for anyone that grew up in the 80’s.  I can’t wait to see it on the big screen!

Much of what I said in my first review carries over to this one as my opinion and observations haven’t changed in this rereading.  If you would like to know what I said in that review you can do so at this link.  If you are excited about seeing the movie please do pick up the book first.  After all the book is always better!

My Rating: 5 Stars

Artemis by Andy Weir

Book Review


ArtemisBook Genre: Science Fiction, 

Book Series: N/A

Released: 11/14/17 by Crown Publishing

Pages: 384 Price: $27.00 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book: Amazon Artemis: A Novel

Source: I received a digital copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.



Book Synopsis:

Jazz Bashara is a criminal.

Well, sort of. Life on Artemis, the first and only city on the moon, is tough if you’re not a rich tourist or an eccentric billionaire. So smuggling in the occasional harmless bit of contraband barely counts, right? Not when you’ve got debts to pay and your job as a porter barely covers the rent.

Everything changes when Jazz sees the chance to commit the perfect crime, with a reward too lucrative to turn down. But pulling off the impossible is just the start of her problems, as she learns that she’s stepped square into a conspiracy for control of Artemis itself—and that now, her only chance at survival lies in a gambit even riskier than the first.

My Review:

Let me start this review off by stating that I love The Martian,  I mean really love that book.  If you follow my blog then you already know this because it seems like I am constantly pimping the book.  I have reviewed it three times after all…(all linked in this review) I was super excited to get my hands on Mr. Weir’s second title because I have also enjoyed many of his short stories that he has published on his website.  Let me also get this out-of-the-way, Artemis is not as strong a story as The Martian.  It simply isn’t.  That’s okay, though, there was a lot to live up to in The Martian and that doesn’t mean that Artemis isn’t a thoroughly enjoyable book because it is.  I’m still giving it five stars, not that I think they are equal, just that The Martian probably deserved like ten stars from me.

Before I started my review I decided to check out some of the other blogger’s thoughts on Artemis and found a mixed bag, some glowing some more critical.  I tend to agree with many of the points of either type of review but they didn’t sway my opinion and decision to give this book five stars.  Let me tell you why.

Lets start with Jazz who seems to receive most of the harsh criticism from reviewers.  Yep she is a little rough around the edges and it can be difficult for a male author to capture the essence of female-hood.  Not that it can’t be done, but it can be a challenge, just as the opposite can be true of a female writing a male.  The tendencies to get carried away with stereotypes can be strong, also sometimes the character can come off feeling a bit off.  Personally I liked Jazz.  I thought she was well written, sure a bit awkward at times and juvenile, but that isn’t necessarily mean she isn’t authentic.  When you take into account the history of the character I think Jazz is pretty true to form.  She was a young girl raised by a single father on the moon.  She is a tomboy and probably didn’t have a strong female role model in her life.  I think she works and have known people in real life like her.  She was smart and funny and I appreciated the strong moral code she lived her life as a smuggler under.  She was flawed but redeeming which makes for a pretty strong character in my book. Just because you might not like someone and think they are awkward doesn’t mean they are lacking.

Now for what I love most about Andy Weir’s books.  The science!  I love that his science fiction is based in real science.  He doesn’t cheat, at least to my non-scientific liberal-arts fine art-degree mind that is.  I might not understand everything he explains in his stories but I love the fact that he takes the time to anyway and doesn’t make me feel stupid in the meantime.  I also enjoy how the lead character talks to the reader, breaking the fourth wall can be tricky.  Easily overdone but not in this instance.  Weir uses it to keep the reader engaged and invested in the story not to mention for comedic reasons.  I loved it!

On last point in this book’s favor that I feel has been overlooked in all the reviews I’ve read thus far.  The diversity in this book is amazing!  I can’t think of a more diverse cast of characters in any book that I’ve ever read, and there have been quite a few.  I don’t know if this speaks more to my reading taste or the industry in general but one of us needs to expand our horizon’s more.  This book was amazing in this regard.  Jazz is a Muslim Saudi female who is the hero of this story!!!  I don’t want to spoil anything else (that was leaked already by Mr. Weir on Facebook) but this book does an excellent job of portraying a diverse blended society.  One other thing I noticed in this book was the lack of Americans.  I’m sure they were there but most of the main functions of this society were not run by companies or people from The United States.   Hmm.  I wonder if this was a bit of social commentary by the author of what might happen to a powerful society that rejects science.  I think it does.

Is the book perfect.  No it can feel a little awkward at times but it was still fun and the ending was amazing.  I can’t wait to add this title to my home library permanently.   I also can’t wait to share this review and book with you my followers and my library patrons.

My Rating: 5 Stars

The Rings of Haven by Ryk Brown

Book Review


The Rings of Haven (The Frontiers Saga #2)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Space Opera, Audiobook

Book Series: The Frontiers Saga part 1 #2

Released:  2/3/2012 by Ryk Brown

Pages: 241  Price: $2.99

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book: Amazon  Ep.2 – “The Rings of Haven” (The Frontiers Saga)

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library



Book Synopsis:

A ship stranded halfway across the galaxy. A difficult and lengthy journey home. A homeworld in urgent need of their return. And now they are running out of food.

The crew of the Aurora must now trust their new allies in order to survive. But their situation may be far more serious than they imagined. And their actions could have repercussions across the galaxy.

Their journey home may just have gotten slightly more complicated.

My Review:

I was surprised that my library actually purchased the second instalment of this series, there must be someone else that suggested the addition to their online catalog too.  I still don’t have high hopes that I will ever finish the series, as there is something like 19 parts and the only easy way to get a hold of them is an e-book through Amazon limiting their availability.

Took me a moment to piece together what happened in part one but once I remembered I did enjoy the story.  Not quite as much as the first but it is difficult to keep the action going in episodic fiction.  Sometimes you have a slower book than others, wherein a longer piece the slow parts are used to break up the action.  Sometimes when a story is released this way, in parts, you end up with a part that is simply all slow.

The story still feels a lot like an episode of Star Trek where the crew interacts with a potentially hostile new world after being marooned on the other side of the galaxy, Voyager anyone.  Don’t get me wrong I love that aspect of the story.  I would like to know more about what happened to humanity on Earth, we still get teased with the setback to the human race but I don’t feel like we were ever really explained what happened.  A couple more pieces were shared but the events still a great mystery to me.

Bottom line I still like the series.  The author is talented and tells a great science fiction space opera story.  If I get a chance to continue through my library I will but if not then I will probably let this one go.  The price is fair, but for so many parts $3 will add up quickly and prices this story right out of my affordability range.  If you have access to Kindle Unlimited, however, this story is one that you can read for free and would be a great option.

My Rating: 3 Stars

A Closed and Common Orbit by Becky Chambers

Book Review


A Closed and Common Orbit (Wayfarers, #2)Book Genre: Science Fiction 

Book Series: Wayfarers #2

Released: 3/14/17 by Harper Voyager

Pages: 364 Price$16.99

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book: A Closed and Common Orbit (Wayfarers)

Source: I borrowed a copy of this book from my library



Book Synopsis:

Embark on an exciting, adventurous, and dangerous journey through the galaxy with the motley crew of the spaceship Wayfarer in this fun and heart-warming space opera—the sequel to the acclaimed The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet.
Lovelace was once merely a ship’s artificial intelligence. When she wakes up in a new body, following a total system shut-down and reboot, she has no memory of what came before. As Lovelace learns to negotiate the universe and discover who she is, she makes friends with Pepper, an excitable engineer, who’s determined to help her learn and grow.
Together, Pepper and Lovey will discover that no matter how vast space is, two people can fill it together.

My Review:

This book was way different from the first in its series.  If you happen to pick this book up not knowing it was second in a series you will be fine reading this as a stand-alone or even out of order.  Not much is going to be spoiled from the first book, only one plot point.  I highly recommend going back and reading the first book as it is also an excellent story.

I almost enjoyed this story as much as the first, just a tad less and am unsure if it is even enough to deduct a star or not.  Maybe I’ll know by the end of the review.  Like I said this story was structured differently from the first.  The story revolves around two points of view instead of multiple and shifted back and forth in time.  We follow Lovey as she adjusts to a life that didn’t go as planned and her struggle to find purpose.  We also learn how Pepper’s back story and some startling revelations as to what has become of humanity among the stars.  Have to say it was a bit disappointing…  Not going to go into more to avoid spoilers.  Pepper struggled with much of the same issues as Lovey only from an organic existence instead of an artificial one.

The book also delves into the question of what makes us human and what defines self-awareness and artificial intelligence which probably isn’t too far off from being an issue in our world.   Soon we will be needing to answer questions as to what rights AI will have and if a machine can be alive and have a sense of self.  Interesting ideas to ponder.

While the first two books in this series had a different feeling to them they both share a lot of heart.  I felt for these characters like I did the first crew.   Both stories tackle interesting issues and gave my brain something to chew over for a while.  I see that there will be a third book in this series and I look forward to reading it as well because this is a talented author that delivers a thought-provoking and entertaining story.

My Rating: 5 Stars

The Long Way to A Small, Angry Planet by Becky Chambers

Book Review


The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers, #1)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Adventure, Space Opera

Book Series: Wayfarers #1

Released: 8/18/15 by Harper Voyager

Pages: 467  Price: $15.99 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book:  The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet (Wayfarers)

Source: I borrowed this book from my library.



Book Synopsis:

A rollicking space adventure with a lot of heart
When Rosemary Harper joins the crew of the Wayfarer, she isn’t expecting much. The patched-up ship has seen better days, but it offers her everything she could possibly want: a spot to call home, a chance to explore the far-off corners of the galaxy, and some distance from her past.
And nothing could be further from what she’s known than the crew of the Wayfarer.
From Sissix, the exotic reptilian pilot, to Kizzy and Jenks, the chatty engineers who keep the ship running, to the noble captain Ashby, life aboard is chaotic and crazy—exactly what Rosemary wants. That is until the crew is offered the job of a lifetime tunneling wormholes through space to a distant planet. Sure, they’ll earn enough money to live comfortably for years, but risking her life wasn’t part of the job description.
The journey through the galaxy is full of excitement, adventure, and mishaps for the Wayfarer team. And along the way, Rosemary comes to realize that a crew is a family, and that family isn’t necessarily the worst thing in the universe… as long as you actually like them.

My Review:

Let me start off by saying this book is awesome.  It is also so what I needed in my life right now reading-wise.  This was the exact sort of book I was looking for.  A science fiction character-driven novel with subtle social commentary.  Ahhh, like putting on a warm fuzzy sweater on a chilly morning.

There is was so much that was great about this book that I’m not quite sure where to begin.  I want to share it all with you, spoiler free, of course.  Let’s start with what I enjoyed most about this story.  The characters.  Hands down the diversity and personality of characters in this book were out of this world (ha, ha, space pun). We have a bit of everything in this book same-sex relationships, aliens that are not carbon copies of humans, the excentric off-the-wall-wondering-if-she-is-crazy-but-want-them-as-your-BFF character, the sour-puss, and so much more.  The diversity of character and species is reason enough to read this book.  I loved them all and enjoyed getting to know them and their backgrounds.

The next aspect of this story that worked for me is that it was a space opera.  If you are looking for a dry technical heavily political serious piece look elsewhere, however.  While this is a space opera science fiction is much more a character-driven story.  We get some science but nothing too technical.  It felt a bit like an extended Star Trek mission but better.  The species and space had more diversity and didn’t feel like they were all based on humanity and Earth only tweaked.  The author did an excellent job of putting thought into creating these new worlds and cultures.  You can also tell she worked hard to make them feel authentic too.

Then there is the subtle social commentary.  Oh, how I love a book that makes us take a good hard look at our society and question just what the hell are we doing.  Why do we have the problems, political and social, that we have?  Most of all I love a story that shows us another way.

This was a fantastic story, not about a crew on the ship Wayfarer but about a family.  A group of vastly different ‘people’ that came together and built a family.  Where everyone has their role and are needed to be complete.  I absolutely loved this story!

My Rating: 5 Stars

Probability Moon by Nancy Kress

Book Review


Probability Moon (Probability, #1)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Space Opera

Book Series: Probability Trilogy #1

Released: 9/16/2002 by Tor

Pages:334  Price: $6.99 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book: Probability Moon (The Probability Trilogy Book 1)

Source: I own a copy of this book



Book Synopsis:

Earth is an environmental disaster area when humanity gains new hope: a star gate is discovered in the solar system, built by a long-gone alien race. Earth establishes extrasolar colonies and discovers alien races–including the warlike Fallers, the only spacefaring race besides humans. Mysterious, uncommunicative, and relentlessly bent on humanity’s extinction, the Fallers have mastered the star gates, and are closing in on earth.
Dr. Bazargan commands the scientific team sent to a newly discovered world to study its humanoid natives: beings who literally perceive only one reality. To lie is to be unreal–and condemned to death. The humans must flee for their lives across the unknown planet when they and the aliens learn the scientific mission is a lie. It’s the cover for a secret military exploration of the moon Tas, which is another artifact of the gate-makers: a superweapon capable of annihilating all life in a star system, and already known to the Fallers.

My Review:

I’m going to do something I rarely do.  Review a book that I did not finish.  I made it all the way to page 172 in this one and just couldn’t go on even though I already own all the books in the trilogy.  It simply wasn’t working for me and I’ll tell you why in a minute.  I’m a bit disappointed, however, as I’ve really been enjoying the books I’ve read by this author.  This one simply isn’t for me and I’m going to walk away before it turns me against the author and prevents me from picking up another book by her.

So what happened?  Not a whole hell of a lot actually.  That was my biggest problem.  I spent much of the book waiting for something to happen.  Or to learn more about this conflict with the Fallers, by the time I left there had been only one brief scene with the ‘bad guys’ in the whole book and it fell flat.  We kept learning how awful they were but by all indication, there seemed to be little interaction between the two species.  Instead much of what I read was read was about a scientific exploration team on this new planet as they learn about the lives of Worlders who perceive reality differently from humans.  It is a less developed race technologically and I had to suppress my desire to quote Star Trek’s prime directive in regards to interfering with a less developed race.  Anyway. The book was just picking up but the death of two characters soured me for reading on.  They didn’t seem to have much to add to the plot beyond being sacrificial lambs that spur the remaining characters into action.

After finishing more than half of the book there simply wasn’t anything or anyone keeping me connected to the story.  The characters felt stiff and I never learned their names properly.  The book did start promising but simply fell apart for me. I do look forward to reading more books by this author but will not be continuing with this trilogy.

My Rating: DNF

Dark Matter by Blake Crouch

Book Review


Dark MatterBook Genre: Science Fiction, Thriller, Mystery

Book Series: N/A

Released: 7/26/16 by Crown

Pages:342  Price: $26.99 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book: Amazon  Dark Matter: A Novel

Source: I borrowed this as an audiobook from my library.  



Book Synopsis:

“Are you happy with your life?”

Those are the last words Jason Dessen hears before the masked abductor knocks him unconscious.

Before he awakens to find himself strapped to a gurney, surrounded by strangers in hazmat suits.

Before a man Jason’s never met smiles down at him and says, “Welcome back, my friend.”

In this world he’s woken up to, Jason’s life is not the one he knows. His wife is not his wife. His son was never born. And Jason is not an ordinary college physics professor, but a celebrated genius who has achieved something remarkable. Something impossible.

Is it this world or the other that’s the dream? And even if the home he remembers is real, how can Jason possibly make it back to the family he loves? The answers lie in a journey more wondrous and horrifying than anything he could’ve imagined—one that will force him to confront the darkest parts of himself even as he battles a terrifying, seemingly unbeatable foe.

From the author of the bestselling Wayward Pines trilogy, Dark Matter is a brilliantly plotted tale that is at once sweeping and intimate, mind-bendingly strange and profoundly human—a relentlessly surprising science-fiction thriller about choices, paths not taken, and how far we’ll go to claim the lives we dream of.


My Review:

Unpopular opinion time.  Just thought I would warn you up front that I did not love this book like so many others have.  I didn’t hate it, however, it was just alright in my opinion.  It felt like someone watched Interstellar and thought the part near the end would make a great book.  I know it isn’t exactly what happen in the movie but I couldn’t help being reminded of that scene so the parallels are there.

After reading some of the other reviews I have to agree this book read like it was written to be turned into a movie.  The lead character felt flat and I struggled to connect with him.  The action was top-notch but I feel like that was at the sacrifice of world building.  I also felt some parts of the plot were added in for pure shock value and that turned me off a bit.

So what did I find interesting, what kept me listening to this audiobook. The idea behind the plot was interesting and some of the dumbed down science as well.  If you are looking to read a pure hard science fiction novel you might want to look elsewhere as there are better ones out there.

Again it was a good book but not a great book.  Still, the book felt gimmicky to me at times and would fit better in the thriller category than the science fiction one in my opinion.  I guess I was looking for more science, less drama.  More character depth, less violence.  More exploring of the multi-verse, less personal obsession.  I also didn’t care for the ending.  I wish he had come up with something else that what he delivered because it started to get a little creepy and cliché. I’ll stop here because the more I think about the story the less I like it…

My Rating: 3 (being kind) Stars

Tomorrow’s Kin by Nancy Kress

Book Review


Tomorrow's Kin (Yesterday's Kin Trilogy, #1)Book Genre: Science Fiction, Dystopian

Book Series: Yesterday’s Kin Trilogy #1

Released: 7/11/17 by Tor Books

Pages: 288 Price: $25.99 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Buy the Book: Amazon Tomorrow’s Kin: Book 1 of the Yesterday’s Kin Trilogy

Source: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for an honest review.



Book Synopsis:

Tomorrow’s Kin is the first volume in and all new hard SF trilogy by Nancy Kress based on the Nebula Award-winning Yesterday’s Kin.

The aliens have arrived… they’ve landed their Embassy ship on a platform in New York Harbor, and will only speak with the United Nations. They say that their world is so different from Earth, in terms of gravity and atmosphere, that they cannot leave their ship. The population of Earth has erupted in fear and speculation.

One day Dr. Marianne Jenner, an obscure scientist working with the human genome, receives an invitation that she cannot refuse. The Secret Service arrives at her college to escort her to New York, for she has been invited, along with the Secretary General of the UN and a few other ambassadors, to visit the alien Embassy.

The truth is about to be revealed. Earth s most elite scientists have ten months to prevent a disaster and not everyone is willing to wait.

My Review:

I’ve read a couple of books by this author and thoroughly enjoyed both of them, in fact, the first book that I read was Yesterday’s Kin.  The book that this series is based upon or is a continuation of.  I thought the cover looked familiar when requesting it so I dug a little deeper and discovered the connection and became concerned for a moment that I was about to read the same book twice.  The page count was different so I decided to continue and see what was different.

I have to confess I did skip the first third of the book which felt like it was either the same as Yesterday’s Kin or close enough that I would probably be fine if I jumped to the new material.  The book was divided into three parts and starting in part two the story picks up where the first novella left off.  If you want to read what I thought of that first third of the story you can do so here, Yesterday’s Kin Review.

So what did I think of this revamped or continued story?  I think it was bloody brilliant!  In my review of the previous story, I held back one star, mentioning closure for two of the characters but perhaps it was more of I needed closure.  I wanted to know more, what happened next.  In this book, the author delivers, big time.  The second part of the book picks up a few years after the first part ends and we get to see the aftermath of what happened on Earth when the aliens left and the disaster struck. It wasn’t pretty, but I think it was pretty accurate in what the author envisioned.  Like The Martian, Ms. Kress uses real science to weave a captivating and thoughtful story about human nature and human’s place in the world.  There was so much I hadn’t thought of if a disaster like this struck.  What the ramifications would be not only to our environment but our way of life and even our evolution.  It was truly fascinating.

The book does feel fairly science accurate but it was never stuffy or boring.  The author never lectures but simply illuminates and uses science to give her story teeth.  Ms. Kress is truly a gifted story-teller and I loved this book.  I am excited that there are two more tales to come as I can not wait to see where she takes these characters next.

If you want a smart yet thrilling science fiction story that echoes current environmental, political, and cultural struggles we face today while throwing an interesting twist then this is a book you are going to want to pick up for yourself.  This story has it all!


My Rating: 5 Stars