Shotgun Lovesongs by Nickolas Butler

Book Review

 


Shotgun LovesongsBook Genre: Fiction, Contemporary 

Book Series: N/A

Released: 3/11/14 by Thomas Dunne Books

Pages:  320 Price$25.99 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library. 

 

 

Book Synopsis:

Hank, Leland, Kip and Ronny were all born and raised in the same Wisconsin town — Little Wing — and are now coming into their own (or not) as husbands and fathers. One of them never left, still farming the family’s land that’s been tilled for generations. Others did leave, went farther afield to make good, with varying degrees of success; as a rock star, commodities trader, rodeo stud. And seamlessly woven into their patchwork is Beth, whose presence among them—both then and now—fuels the kind of passion one comes to expect of love songs and rivalries.

Now all four are home, in hopes of finding what could be real purchase in the world. The result is a shared memory only half-recreated, riddled with culture clashes between people who desperately wish to see themselves as the unified tribe they remember, but are confronted with how things have, in fact, changed.

There is conflict here between longtime buddies, between husbands and wives — told with writing that is, frankly, gut-wrenching, and even heartbreaking. But there is also hope, healing, and at times, even heroism. It is strong, American stuff, not at all afraid of showing that we can be good, too — not just fallible and compromising. Shotgun Lovesongs is a remarkable and uncompromising saga that explores the age-old question of whether or not you can ever truly come home again — and the kind of steely faith and love returning requires. 

My Review:

Book Talk book time for me.  Last month I struck out with my selection of A Visit From the Goon Squad but this month I seem to have hit it out of the park with Shotgun Lovesongs!  I came back from vacation to find several of the books returned already and thought, oh no, they hated my pick again.  Then I see that several other books by this author have been ordered and everyone stopping by my desk tells me how much they enjoyed this book! So yay.

I had not read it yet and was still apprehensive about what I would think about the story because popularity in the community does not automatically mean it will be something I enjoy as well.  It did take me until about halfway through my listen before I realized that I too enjoyed this story.

Not usually a fan of contemporary fiction I selected this book for our book talk for its music theme that fits in with our summer reading program.  I also liked how it was based in an area of Wisconsin that most of my patrons will be familiar with.  The small town lifestyle and relationships of the characters were also things that I thought would be relatable to our group.  I was correct on all of these points.

So, what did I think of the book?  For me, it was the torch that Leland carried for Beth, his best friend’s wife, that won me over.  His love for her and respect for their marriage just broke my heart.  He loved Beth, never stopped, but eventually found a way to be happy for them.  Of course, he almost fucks it up and destroys not only the marriage but his friendship with Henry.

I also enjoyed reading Ronny’s story.  He is the glue that holds this friendship together over the years.  You end up spending much of the book feeling sorry for the man, which was intentional, but I was delighted to see how things ended for him. Finding a happiness that no one expected.

I was a little less enamored with Beth than the boys of this story were.  I wanted her to have more of a backbone and stand up to Henry who spent the second half of the book punishing her for a crime she didn’t commit.  I so wanted her to smack him upside the head and tell him to get his head out of his ass and get over it.  She never cheated on him and his being an ass over a something that happened when they were not together was not fair on his part.

I don’t remember the last friend much.  Kip had more of a supporting role and almost seemed like an afterthought.  We did have one interesting story about his time in Chicago that about broke my heart but other than being there as a catalyst for events involving the other three I don’t feel like I got to know him very well.

My final thoughts on this book are this.  It was a beautiful story. One about friendships and how they change over time.  About love and the one that got away.  Small town life and the rights and rituals that help keep a community together.  A story about finding home and learning to be happy there.

My Rating: 4 Stars

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The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson

Book Review

 


The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed AmericaBook Genre: Non-Fiction, History, True Crime

Book Series: N/A

Released: 2/11/03 by Random House

Pages: 447 Price: $25.95 Audiobook

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library.  

 

 

Book Synopsis:

Erik Larson’s gifts as a storyteller are magnificently displayed in this rich narrative of the master builder, the killer, and the great fair that obsessed them both.

Two men, each handsome and unusually adept at his chosen work, embodied an element of the great dynamic that characterized America’s rush toward the twentieth century. The architect was Daniel Hudson Burnham, the fair’s brilliant director of works and the builder of many of the country’s most important structures, including the Flatiron Building in New York and Union Station in Washington, D.C. The murderer was Henry H. Holmes, a young doctor who, in a malign parody of the White City, built his “World’s Fair Hotel” just west of the fairgrounds—a torture palace complete with dissection table, gas chamber, and 3,000-degree crematorium. Burnham overcame tremendous obstacles and tragedies as he organized the talents of Frederick Law Olmsted, Charles McKim, Louis Sullivan, and others to transform swampy Jackson Park into the White City, while Holmes used the attraction of the great fair and his own satanic charms to lure scores of young women to their deaths. What makes the story all the more chilling is that Holmes really lived, walking the grounds of that dream city by the lake.

The Devil in the White City draws the reader into a time of magic and majesty, made all the more appealing by a supporting cast of real-life characters, including Buffalo Bill, Theodore Dreiser, Susan B. Anthony, Thomas Edison, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, and others. In this book the smoke, romance, and mystery of the Gilded Age come alive as never before.

My Review:

Next week my husband and I will be spending some time in Chicago and Hyde Park is on my list of places to explore.  I decided that I wanted to read something either set in Chicago or Non-Fiction about Chicago and this book has an excellent reputation.  I was fortunate that it became available a week before our trip and I could listen to it before our trip.  I was a little hesitant being that the book is pretty far out of my typical reading taste but decided to give it a chance knowing I could always DNF if I didn’t like it.  Much to my surprise I ended up loving the book and spent every spare moment I could find listening to the history of Chicago during the 1893 World’s Fair.

Like another reviewer stated, this is actually two books in one.  One storyline follows the creation and running of the World Fair and the other follows what is considered America’s first serial killer H.H. Holmes.  One of these stories interested me far more than the other.   Not being a fan of hearing about a psychopath lure and con unsuspecting individuals to their death I wish there had been a way to skip those parts.  I read this book purely for the story of how the Columbia Exposition came to be.  That part was fascinating to me while the other plot was quite disturbing.  Larson does an okay job of piecing these two plots together but in the end, I have to agree with another review I read and the two subjects have little to do with each other besides geographical location and that some of the murders took place around the same time as the fair.  If you are into such dark history then this part of the book might be perfect for you.

For the plotline that I was interested in, it was fascinating to hear what all it took to create such a grand fair.  I needed to remind myself that this was 125 years ago and society was vastly different from it is today.  While I found the blatant racism and sexism upsetting it is authentic to the era that was being depicted.  While some individuals in this country want to “Make America Great Again” we have to stop to consider if America was truly “great” back then.  Do we want to return to a time when women architects were paid 1/10 of their male counterparts if they were allowed to compete at all?  Or to a time when work conditions were so shitty that many lost their life or limb on the job?  Or we consider whole groups of our country as second-class citizens?

Politics aside it is a fascinating part of our history, one we can learn from.  I wish that the group putting the fair together had managed to get their act together quicker, however.  Perhaps then most of the structures would not have been built out of temporary materials and more of the fair could have lasted to the modern era.  I still plan to visit Jackson Park next week though, and thanks to Larson I will be able to imagine what it must have looked like in 1893 when America built a White City to impress the world.

My Rating: 4 Stars

Life, the Universe and Everything by Douglas Adams

Book Review


Life, the Universe and Everything (Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, #3)Book Genre: Science Fiction

Book Series: Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy #3

Released: 12/29/1982 by Pan

Pages:  224 Price: $16.00 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library.  

 

 

Book Synopsis:

The unhappy inhabitants of planet Krikkit are sick of looking at the night sky above their heads–so they plan to destroy it. The universe, that is. Now only five individuals stand between the killer robots of Krikkit and their goal of total annihilation.
They are Arthur Dent, a mild-mannered space and time traveler who tries to learn how to fly by throwing himself at the ground and missing; Ford Prefect, his best friend, who decides to go insane to see if he likes it; Slartibartfast, the indomitable vice president of the Campaign for Real Time, who travels in a ship powered by irrational behavior; Zaphod Beeblebrox, the two-headed, three-armed ex-president of the galazy; and Trillian, the sexy space cadet who is torn between a persistent Thunder God and a very depressed Beeblebrox.
How will it all end? Will it end? Only this stalwart crew knows as they try to avert “universal” Armageddon and save life as we know it–and don’t know it!
 

My Review:

I have to confess I listened to this book twice.  Not because it was so great but because when I sat down to write the review I realized that I had not paid attention for most of the book and didn’t know anything that happened.  So, I was going to town the next day and decided to go shopping and decided to start the book over again.  It is only five hours long and shopping took up three or four of those so it wasn’t a great hardship.  I liked enough of what I could remember to want to go back and see what I missed.

I did manage to pay a bit better attention for most of the book in the second listening but that final hour and a half I still lost interest.  I’m not going to try a third time.  I did like the book and have enjoyed the series for the most part.  Got to love quirky British humor.  I think the main problem for me was this story was simply a bit disjointed for me. Too much all over the place and didn’t hold enough continuity.  It wrapped up nicely and brought everything around in a full circle but everything in between left me a little lost.

For much of the book, the group was separated from one another and pairs of them were off doing their own thing.  I needed the chemistry of the whole gang together for it to work for me.

I did enjoy the social commentary and observations that I noticed and that is what is going to keep me coming back for the next book.  I’ve also taken a shining to Arthur Dent.  He is such the reluctant hero who just wants a cup of tea and to be left alone while continuously being dragged into this crazy plot.  Loads of fun when I can focus.  Perhaps this is a book that would have worked better for me in print.  I would have missed out on some great narration, however as the reader does an excellent job of portraying these characters.

My Rating: 3 Stars

Eleventh Grave in Moonlight by Darynda Jones (Reread)

Book Review

 


Eleventh Grave in Moonlight (Charley Davidson, #11)Book Genre: Paranormal, Romance, Urban Fantasy

Book Series: Charley Davidson #11

Released: 1/24/17 by St. Martin’s Press

Pages: 310 Price: $26.99 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library. 

 

 

Book Synopsis:

A typical day in the life of Charley Davidson involves cheating husbands, missing people, errant wives, philandering business owners, and oh yeah…demons, hell hounds, evil gods, and dead people. Lots and lots of dead people. As a part time Private Investigator and full-time Grim Reaper, Charley has to balance the good, the bad, the undead, and those who want her dead. In this eleventh installment, Charley is learning to make peace with the fact that she is a goddess with all kinds of power and that her own daughter has been born to save the world from total destruction. But the forces of hell are determined to see Charley banished forever to the darkest corners of another dimension. With the son of Satan himself as her husband and world-rocking lover, maybe Charley can find a way to have her happily ever after after all.

My Review:

While I’ve been enjoying this reread of the Charley Davidson series I’m ready to be done and read the last book.  I’m glad I took the time to refresh the entire series but I desperately want fresh material and to know how everything ends up!  There have been some teasers shared in the synopsis of the last book shocked me a bit as to what might have happened between book 12 and 13.  All I know for sure is that I. Need. It. Now.

Anyway, not a lot I can say that wasn’t said in my review of the print book.  I remember the plot in this one and the next better than earlier books because I read them recently.  The cliffhanger ended was a little less traumatic because I know what happens in book 12.

Overall this has been a great listen, though.  If anyone is looking for a sexy fun, hilarious audiobook for a road trip or simply while working on something I highly suggest this one.  The voice artist was truly an excellent choice for this series.

It will be a bit of a wait before I can get book 12.  I’m something like number 16 in line for four copies.  I should be able to finish it well before 2019 when the last book is slated for release but I might be a month or two before I can finish the reread.

My Rating: 5 Stars

House of the Rising Son by Sherrilyn Kenyon

Book Review

 


House of the Rising Son (Dark Hunter #22.5; The Entire Dark-Hunterverse, #28)Book Genre: Paranormal, Fantasy, Romance

Book Series: Dark Hunter 22.5

Released: 1/21/14 by St. Martin’s Press

Pages: 115  Price: $2.99 E-Book

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library. 

 

 

Book Synopsis:

The eldest son in a family of three boys, Aricles had no desire to be a soldier, even though his fighting skills were among the best in the world. He was more than content on his small Atlantean farm, living a quiet, uneventful life. But when his brother is determined to don a soldier’s uniform, Aricles joins him with a promise to their father to bring his brother home in one piece. What he never counts on is how much their new lives will forever change them, or what the risk of a forbidden love will ultimately cost him.

My Review:

This is a short story included in the Dark Bites anthology and is the origin story for Styxx and Beth.  This story is the origin of how their two souls met and fell in love.  If you have not read Styxx you will be fine as this doesn’t give anything away.  If you have read Styxx then this is a sad but interesting read to learn about how their love started.  Warning, this does not end well but then again it is not the end of their story.  The HEA comes in Styxx’s book.

It wasn’t a very long listen but it took me a bit to figure out that it was a prequel to Styxx’s book.  I thought it was interesting but have to confess that I’m simply not that into reading about sex/romance anymore.  I blame menopause.  Whatever the reason I found myself losing interest once the characters started hooking up.  If you are a fan of the series though you will want to add this one to your list as it will add to the broader overall scope of the world.  Just be prepared for heartbreak.

My Rating: 3 Stars

A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan

Book Review

 


A Visit from the Goon SquadBook Genre: Fiction, Contemporary, Audiobook

Book Series: N/A

Released: 6/8/2010 by Knopf

Pages: 288 Price:$14.95 Paperback

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed the audiobook from the library.

 

 

Book Synopsis:

Jennifer Egan’s spellbinding interlocking narratives circle the lives of Bennie Salazar, an aging former punk rocker and record executive, and Sasha, the passionate, troubled young woman he employs. Although Bennie and Sasha never discover each other’s pasts, the reader does, in intimate detail, along with the secret lives of a host of other characters whose paths intersect with theirs, over many years, in locales as varied as New York, San Francisco, Naples, and Africa.

We first meet Sasha in her mid-thirties, on her therapist’s couch in New York City, confronting her long-standing compulsion to steal. Later, we learn the genesis of her turmoil when we see her as the child of a violent marriage, then as a runaway living in Naples, then as a college student trying to avert the suicidal impulses of her best friend. We plunge into the hidden yearnings and disappointments of her uncle, an art historian stuck in a dead marriage, who travels to Naples to extract Sasha from the city’s demimonde and experiences an epiphany of his own while staring at a sculpture of Orpheus and Eurydice in the Museo Nazionale. We meet Bennie Salazar at the melancholy nadir of his adult life—divorced, struggling to connect with his nine-year-old son, listening to a washed-up band in the basement of a suburban house—and then revisit him in 1979, at the height of his youth, shy and tender, reveling in San Francisco’s punk scene as he discovers his ardor for rock and roll and his gift for spotting talent. We learn what became of his high school gang—who thrived and who faltered—and we encounter Lou Kline, Bennie’s catastrophically careless mentor, along with the lovers and children left behind in the wake of Lou’s far-flung sexual conquests and meteoric rise and fall. 

A Visit from the Goon Squad is a book about the interplay of time and music, about survival, about the stirrings and transformations set inexorably in motion by even the most passing conjunction of our fates. In a breathtaking array of styles and tones ranging from tragedy to satire to PowerPoint, Egan captures the undertow of self-destruction that we all must either master or succumb to; the basic human hunger for redemption; and the universal tendency to reach for both—and escape the merciless progress of time—in the transporting realms of art and music. Sly, startling, exhilarating work from one of our boldest writers.

My Review:

I was in charge of selecting the two Book Talk books for June and July at the library where I work.  Wanting to tie into our Summer Reading Program, which is open to all patrons this year (adults for the first time).  I sought out books that would work well with the theme which is Library’s Rock.  After finishing this book I feel that it works well but am a bit nervous about what the ladies in our reading group will think of it.  A couple of them will love the Rock n’ Roll theme of the book but a few might have issues with the sex, drugs, and swearing in the novel.  The books arrived today so I guess there is no turning back…

Now, onto what I thought of the book.  I’m not sure exactly, the book lost me a little in the middle as I tried to listen to it during a time I couldn’t concentrate.  I didn’t hate it but I don’t think I got it either.  Being told from a new POV each chapter giving a slightly different perspective on different events over the span of years this book follows meant if I didn’t care for a character I only needed to suffer through them for one chapter.  While that was nice in some instances you also have the problem of not being able to become attached and invested in any one character either.  So you need to either be really excited about the overall picture the book is trying to paint or wander through the book wondering what the point of it all is.  I think I fell into the latter group.  I think I get the message the author was trying to give me but by the end, I didn’t really care.

I did like how the story came full circle at the end but listening to the audiobook left me out of the loop for the chapter told in PowerPoint slide as I don’t think it had the same effect being read to you instead of seeing them in person.  I do plan to check out that chapter before the book talk.  I also found the chapter dealing with the concept of evolving language over the years.  How words are adapted over time by each generation that uses them.  This is something that I have noticed working in the library.  The conflict between an older generation that thinks their ownership of language and communication should not be challenged and a younger group that could care less about what they think.

While I’m nervous about the book talk I’m also looking forward to seeing what others in my community think of the book.  Perhaps they will help me see what I missed.  Without further input, however, I’m going to shrug my shoulders and say eh.  I didn’t hate it, but I didn’t love it either and never found myself excited to listen to it.

My Rating: 2 Stars

Frost Burned by Patricia Briggs (Reread)

Book Review

 


Frost Burned (Mercy Thompson, #7)Book Genre: Paranormal, Urban Fantasy

Book Series: Mercy Thompson #7

Released: 3/5/13 by Ace Books

Pages: 342  Price: $26.95 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library. 

 

 

Book Synopsis:

Patricia Briggs’s novel River Marked was praised as “an urban fantasy where our everyday world is believably twisted into the world of fey, werewolves, vampires, and myths made real.” Now Mercy Thompson faces a shapeshifter’s biggest fear as the realm she has embraced is thrown into chaos…

Mercy Thompson’s life has undergone a seismic change. Becoming the mate of Adam Hauptman – the charismatic Alpha of the local werewolf pack – has made her a stepmother to his daughter Jesse, a relationship that brings moments of blissful normalcy to Mercy’s life. But on the edges of humanity, a minor mishap on an ordinary day can turn into so much more…

After an accident in bumper-to-bumper traffic, Mercy and Jesse can’t reach Adam – or anyone else in the pack for that matter. They’ve all been abducted.

Through their mating bond, all Mercy knows is that Adam is angry and in pain. But she fears Adam’s disappearance may be related to the political battle the werewolves have been fighting to gain acceptance from the public – and that he and the pack are in serious danger. Outmatched and on her own, Mercy may be forced to seek assistance from any ally she can get, no matter how unlikely.

My Review:

Well, that was quick!  I believe I managed to listen to this book in just over a day.  There is a lot of drama in book seven, not that the other didn’t have action but for some reason, this one felt more frantic.  Probably because most of the pack was missing and Mercy was on the run for much of the story.

Much of the book we are led to believe that the aggressors are a radical hate group bent on setting up the supernatural species as bad guys so they will be free to hunt them down for extermination.  A lot of events are alluded to that I believe probably took place in the spin-off series Alpha and Omega so it might be good to read both series in order of printing together and not separately.  I have a feeling the reader will benefit from watching all the events that affect both series as they unfold instead of simply being told about them.

At the end of the book, we learn who is truly pulling the strings regarding the pack’s abduction and I won’t spoil it for you.  It was an interesting battle scene, to say the least.  The pack loses an important but rarely seen member and we have a visit from Asil from the Alpha and Omega series which was fun as he is a character I enjoy.

I have a bit of a dilemma for the next two books.  They are not available in audio format from my library.  I wouldn’t mind continuing with the series reread but I’m not sure I want to read them or not.  I’m rather enjoying listening to them this time.  The next book is one I liked but the one after that is not one I enjoyed.  I might skip that one and simply reread the next book.  The latest release in the series is available from my library so I will be able to finish the reread in audio format.

My Rating: 4 Stars

River Marked by Patricia Briggs (reread)

Book Review

 


River Marked (Mercy Thompson, #6)Book Genre:  Urban Fantasy, Paranormal, Audiobook

Book Series: Mercy Thompson #6

Released: 3/1/11 by Ace Books

Pages:  326 Price: $26.95 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed the audiobook from my library.

 

 

Book Synopsis:

Coyote shifter Mercy Thompson knows that life with her mate, the Alpha werewolf Adam, will never be boring, but even their wedding doesn’t go as planned. Nevertheless, a ten-day honeymoon camping on the banks of the Columbia River, alone, just the two of them, should make up for it. But the trip – and the pimped-out trailer they’re using – is courtesy of the fae. And nothing from the fae comes without strings attached…

Being a different breed of shapeshifter – a walker – Mercy can see ghosts, but the spirit of her long-gone father has never visited her. Until now. An evil is stirring in the depths of the Columbia River – and innocent people are dying. As other walkers make their presence know to Mercy, she must reconnect with her heritage to exorcise the world of the legend known as the river devil… 

My Review:

It feels like I should be further along in the reread of this series.  Maybe because I am also reread the spin-off series at the same time.  Whatever the reason I find it difficult to believe that this is only book number six.

I originally gave this book only four-stars and I’m not sure why. I enjoyed this book quite a bit. We get to attend Mercy and Adam’s wedding and join them on their honeymoon where of course trouble follows Mercy thanks to some finagling by the Fae.  While I feel that this is the book where Mercy and Adam’s relationship loses its last interest, becoming much tamer in later books, we do get a bit of heat between the lovebirds.

What interested me most about this book was the chance to explore some of the Native American paranormal legends and creatures.  We learn a bit about a side of Mercy that hasn’t been delved into much in earlier books and we get to meet Coyote which was confusing and fascinating at the same time.

I’m going to leave the rating where it is but I do think I probably enjoyed this more the second time read it.  I have the next book already started but then the book eight and nine are not available through my library online.  I choices are to skip the books, read them, or try to get my hands on the audiobooks another way.  I liked book eight but book nine didn’t work that well for me.  I might read books eight and then skip nine.  Or maybe I should reread nine and see if my opinion has changed for that one.  Maybe I’ll enjoy it more the second time too.  I have a bit to wait before I need to make up my mind though.

My Rating: 4 Stars

The Curse of Tenth Grave by Darynda Jones

Book Review

 


The Curse of Tenth Grave (Charley Davidson, #10)Book Genre: Romance, Urban Fantasy, Paranormal

Book Series: Charley Davidson #10

Released: 6/28/16 by St. Martin’s Griffen

Pages: 352 Price: $26.99 hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library

 

 

Book Synopsis:

As a part-time PI and full-time grim reaper, Charley Davidson has asked a lot of questions throughout her life: 
* Why can I see dead people? 
* Who is the hot supernatural entity following me? 
* How do I get gum out of my sister’s hair before she wakes up? 
* But, “How do I trap not one malevolent god, but three?” was never among them. Until now. And since those gods are on earth to kill her daughter, she has little choice but to track them down, trap them, and cast them from this dimension.

There’s just one problem. One of the three stole her heart a very long time ago. Can the Razer, a god of absolute death and destruction, change his omniscient spots, or will his allegiances lie with his brothers?

Those are just a few of the questions Charley must answer, and quick. Add to that a homeless girl running for her life, an innocent man who’s been charged with murder, and a pendant made from god glass that has the entire supernatural world in an uproar, and Charley has her hands full. If she can manage to take care of the whole world-destroying-gods thing, we’re saved. If not, well…

My Review:

I can’t believe I’ve finished book 10 of my reread/listen of this series!  I’m going to have a bit of a wait for book 11 and 12 which is alright as the last book doesn’t release until 2019.  I have to say it has been a blast listening to these books and I’m going to explore rereading other series I enjoy in audio format.  I used to not enjoy audiobooks but now that I’ve gotten used to them it is a rewarding and different way to enjoy books.  After all, doesn’t most of us start off with having books read to us as children?

Not a lot I can add to my previous review as I’m getting into the books in this series that I’ve read fairly recently.  Much of the plot is fresher in my memory and there are fewer surprises of stuff I forgot.  I had forgotten that this book ended on a huge cliffhanger but since I know what happens next it isn’t such a big deal.

At the end of the audiobook, we are again treated to an interview with the author which is simply the icing on the cake as far as I’m concerned.  It is so cool to listen to Ms. Jones’s thoughts on the characters and how she got some of her inspiration.  Totally worth listening to the books for the interview alone.

One thing that rereading this series has made me realize is just how much I’m going to miss this series when it ends.  I really like Charley, Reyes, Cookie, Uncle Bob, and all the others.  I do hope that Ms. Jones takes this series into the future and does a spin-off featuring beep and her army.  Fingers crossed!

My Rating: 5 Stars

Silver Borne by Patricia Briggs

Book Review

 


Silver Borne (Mercy Thompson, #5)Book Genre: Paranormal, Urban Fantasy

Book Series: Mercy Thompson #5

Released: 3/30/10 by Ace Books

Pages: 342 Price: $24.95 Hardcover

Links:  Goodreads, Author’s Site

Source: I borrowed this audiobook from my library.  

 

 

Book Synopsis:

Mercy Thompson, car mechanic and shapeshifter, never knows what the day – or night – may bring in a world where “witches, vampires, werewolves, and shapeshifters live beside ordinary people” (Booklist). But she is about to learn that while some secrets are dangerous whose who seek them are just plain deadly…

Mercy is smart enough to realize that when it comes to the magical fae, the less you know, the better. But you can’t always get what you want. When she attempts to return a powerful fae she previously borrowed in an act of desperation, she finds the bookstore locked up and closed down.

It seems the book contains secrets – and the fae will do just about anything to keep it out of the wrong hands. And if that doesn’t take enough of Mercy’s attention, her friend Samuel is struggling with his wolf side – leaving Mercy to cover for him lest his own father declare Samuel’s life forfeit.

All in all, Mercy has had better days. And if she isn’t careful, she may not have many more…

My Review:

I’ve been enjoying this reread of the Mercy Thompson series so much!  I almost feel like they have been better the second time around.  I think the narrator adds so much to my increased enjoyment.  She does a fantastic job of changing her voice to match the different characters.

In book five we have Mercy and Adam fully established as a couple even though they are not formally married or living together yet.  Briggs also needs to tidy up the loose end of Samuel before we can move forward with Mercy and Adam.  That plot line is tackled in this book with some pretty drastic drama that left me afraid of what would happen to him even though I’ve read this book before.  Damn menopausal brain… I swear I must only retain 30% of what I read sometimes.  Most likely it is just that I read so much that the stories all start blending in together.

We also deal with pack drama in this book as they are fighting Mercy’s addition to the pack.  There is also a plot to overthrow Adam as alpha of the pack.  The main instigator of book five is the Fae again which isn’t my favorite group in this world but I was surprised at how much I enjoyed the plot this time.

I’m torn over raising my star rating or not.  I don’t think I will, four stars is still a great rating but I do feel like I enjoyed the book more the second time around.

My Rating: 4 Stars